Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Apr 2013 22:27 UTC
Google It's apparently browser engine day today. After Mozilla and Samsung announcing Servo, Google has just announced it's forking WebKit into Blink. Like WebKit, Blink will be open source, and it will also be used by other browser makers - most prominently, Opera has already announced it's not using WebKit, but Blink. Update: Courtesy of MacRumors, this graph illustrates how just how much Google contributed to WebKit. Much more than I thought. Also, Chrome developer Alex Russell: "To make a better platform faster, you must be able to iterate faster. Steps away from that are steps away from a better platform. Today's WebKit defeats that imperative in ways large and small. It's not anybody's fault, but it does need to change. And changing it will allow us to iterate faster, working through the annealing process that takes a good idea from drawing board to API to refined feature."
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RE[3]: Is Blink Open Source?
by Neolander on Thu 4th Apr 2013 18:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Is Blink Open Source?"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

I'd say that you do have a remarkable talent for picking examples that mainly target the core iOS demographics. That's perhaps not so surprising, though, since as an Apple user you probably belong to one or several of those demographics yourself.

Gogoair only provide services to large, and thus highly expensive air companies. This means that their data will have a bias towards people which have lots of money to spend in plane tickets. Perhaps an extra $20000 of average household income in the US could have an influence in this area? http://techcrunch.com/2012/09/26/forrester-iphone-app-users-young-a...

Another thing worth noting about Gogoair is that it solely provides service to northern american companies, which may tend to artificially inflate the specificities of the american population. Since a picture is better than a thousand words... http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-ww-monthly-201303-201303-map

The Oolaya example chosen by AllThingsD is also interesting, since that company does not take care of any major video website like Youtube, Dailymotion, or Vimeo, instead providing smaller "inline video" services to various online newspapers. Depending on how said services are implemented, it may well happen that they do not get the full share of Android video views because those are displayed a Flash video player without ever seeing Ooyala tech (remember, the Flash Player plugin is still installed on a large number of Android devices).

Also, this selectivity towards use cases where video is a "bonus content" rather than the main thing that people want to see may again bias towards the iOS user base, but experiment would be needed to check if and why this is the case. All that I say for now in this area is that specific examples may come with specific results.

And then there's Fortune3, which is nothing less than an e-commerce company. Bias towards e-commerce was one of the main criticisms of StatCounter regarding the methodology of NetApplications, and in the specific case of mobile ecosystems (where, again, iOS users tend to have much more money to spend), it's easy to see why it would be a problem.

Just as an aside, I don't think that no matter what each of us says, we are ever going to agree on this matter. You have an Apple agenda that you feel an unhealthy need to push no matter how ridiculous it gets, and myself I find that company remarkably irritating for various reasons ranging from moral opinions to design philosophies. Because of this, and because we manipulate data that is as hard to measure, and thus far away from hard facts, as usage statistics, it appears to me that this discussion cannot go anywhere. So perhaps we should just switch to some other conversation subject which we can agree on, such having a good laugh at Microsoft's attempts at going touchscreen.

Edited 2013-04-04 18:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22


And then there's Fortune3, which is nothing less than an e-commerce company. Bias towards e-commerce was one of the main criticisms of StatCounter regarding the methodology of NetApplications, and in the specific case of mobile ecosystems (where, again, iOS users tend to have much more money to spend), it's easy to see why it would be a problem.



Exactly. iOS supports greater commercialisation and hence is a per capita a more effective platform. A platform is just something upon which other things stand and almost every one of those things that stand on a platform do so for commercial reasons. Android has been and remains a much weaker commercial platform and much flows from that. Platforms rise and fall, are successful or failures, are weaker or stronger, on the basis of the commercial activity they support. Currently iOS supports considerable more commercial activity per user than Android, therefore to a third party entity interested in commercialising some aspect of the various mobile platforms an iOS user is worth considerably more than an Android user.

Reply Parent Score: -1

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Nonsense. An effective platform is one that makes it easy to get things done. You just described an expensive platform. Or profitable, depending on which side of the table you're on. For you, it's merely more expensive.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Is Blink Open Source?
by Neolander on Fri 5th Apr 2013 06:48 in reply to "RE[4]: Is Blink Open Source?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Your use of the "effective" word here is a bit weird, as it seems that to you, the only thing that matters on a software platform is how much money can be extracted from users. Basically, what you're saying here is that as far as computing works, users do not matter, they are just a bunch of mindless sheeps from which money can be pumped out as needed.

I do hope for Apple that it's not how they are thinking. Because if having a lot of revenue per capita is all that determined the success of a software platform, then it would be OSX, not Windows, which would be the main desktop operating system today. Which is obviously not the case.

Let me explain my point.

You have strongly stressed the point that what you're caring about is revenue per capita, and not global revenue. Mac users bring a lot of money to the Mac ecosystem simply by buying such expensive machines, and to do so, they must have a lot of money to spend in computers. So that money will likely go into more expensive Mac-related peripherals and software than those of the overall more resource-constrained Windows crowd.

Beyond that purchase step, Macs have long had a very poor freeware ecosystem, since they have neither the sheer user base of Windows nor the developer-centric ecosystem of other Unices. This means that on OSX, if you want to do something which the system is not good at, you pretty much have to pay for it, or satisfy yourself with low-functional demo versions. Perhaps the Mac App Store can help with that, but we won't know until a few more decades.

So, in theory at least, the Mac platform had everything that you like and consider efficient. Expensive hardware, expensive software, rich users, and no freeware escape route. Yet the Windows platform has, in the end, come to dominate.

So, what could play a role in this turn of event, which should be surprising for you. Probably not Microsoft's heavy-handed politics, since Apple have just as long of a juridic and PR arm. Probably not money either, since Apple make tons of it. So could it just be users?


-Due to the PC world's more relaxed attitude towards OEMs, there is a broader hardware diversity, which means that the platform targets much more potential users. As a user, there is something for you in the PC world whether you have a high or low budget, and whether you are a bored accountant or a crazy gamer.

-With users come developers, since the will to develop software comes with the daily experience of an OS' limitations, and since one cannot develop good software without having a machine to test it on.

-With developers comes software, both small freewares and cheap sharewares which have been written just for the sheer satisfaction of scratching an itch, and commercial stuff which is here to feed the kids.

-With software come more users, since if a platform can do more than the others AND is more comfortable to get into and deal with, then users will choose it.


It's just a positive feedback loop, which sadly makes life much harder for new platforms and thus tends to lead to stagnation in the long run. Even in the commercial world, people tend to prefer the larger ecosystem when the difference becomes big enough. Because when you have lots of users on a platform, even if they spend less on the average, they tend to spend more as a whole in the long run. Which is what matters on a quarterly financial sheet.

Which is why when software exists for both OSX and Windows, the OSX version tends to be less polished, and also why Apple have to regularly buy new companies and force themselves to shut down their Windows products in order to stay relevant in the multimedia field, rather than having Mac users and developers spontaneously help them by building better products on their own.

Edited 2013-04-05 06:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Is Blink Open Source?
by zima on Sun 7th Apr 2013 13:00 in reply to "RE[3]: Is Blink Open Source?"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

You have an Apple agenda that you feel an unhealthy need to push no matter how ridiculous it gets, and myself I find that company remarkably irritating for various reasons ranging from moral opinions to design philosophies.

He outright said once "I write to defend Apple" ...I don't get how one can be so consumed for 2-3 decades by a company, of all things.
People like Tony Swash swayed me against Apple, in a way - at some point I was kinda supportive of Apple and recommended its products ...but I don't want to be associated with some of its vocal supporters.

But... don't you still use an iMac G4? ;p


PS. Thanks for pointing out that StatCounter introduced maps. "Mobile browser" is also a nice one: http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_browser-ww-monthly-201304-201304-...
And I wonder if "screen resolution" ( http://gs.statcounter.com/#resolution-ww-monthly-201304-201304-map ) shows where people have misconfigured widescreen monitors :p

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Is Blink Open Source?
by Neolander on Sun 7th Apr 2013 13:24 in reply to "RE[4]: Is Blink Open Source?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

He outright said once "I write to defend Apple" ...I don't get how one can be so consumed for 2-3 decades by a company, of all things.
People like Tony Swash swayed me against Apple, in a way - at some point I was kinda supportive of Apple and recommended its products ...but I don't want to be associated with some of its vocal supporters.

I still try to force myself to judge products separately from their creators and users on my side, but I'll also be the first one to agree that it's stupidly hard.

But... don't you still use an iMac G4? ;p

Not anymore, thankfully. My research team recently received a bunch of funding, so my supervisor bought himself a new MacBook Pro and donated the old one to me. I also used the opportunity to build myself a comfy desk with a large screen of adjustable height and some serious chair.

Oh, and of course I've ended up dual-booting Mint 13 Xfce on the thing too. It was a truly enlightening process, I just hope my mental sanity won't suffer too much from what I've discovered about Apple's hardware and firmwares along the way. Though as a PhD student and Linux user I'm probably a lost cause already!

PS. Thanks for pointing out that StatCounter introduced maps. "Mobile browser" is also a nice one: http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_browser-ww-monthly-201304-201304-...
And I wonder if "screen resolution" ( http://gs.statcounter.com/#resolution-ww-monthly-201304-201304-map ) shows where people have misconfigured widescreen monitors :p

Just love how the main screen resolution in SK is already 1080p by a large margin. Sounds like no matter how hard we try in other countries, the average Korean will always end up with the best Starcraft gaming rig ;)

Edited 2013-04-07 13:28 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1