Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd May 2013 13:38 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The Verge has learned that HTC's Chief Product Officer, Kouji Kodera, left the company last week. Kodera was responsible for HTC's overall product strategy, which makes the departure especially notable on the heels of the global launch of the make-or-break One. It's not just Kodera. In the past three-odd months, HTC has lost a number of employees in rapid succession." I really hope HTC pulls it together.
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RE: Comment by Nelson
by tylerdurden on Wed 22nd May 2013 18:15 UTC in reply to "Comment by Nelson"
tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

Yeah, it is clear that the best way to go against Samsung's products is using outdated HW platforms, running an OS with little traction overall in the smart phone market space... makes perfect sense.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by Nelson
by Nelson on Wed 22nd May 2013 22:40 in reply to "RE: Comment by Nelson"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Yeah, it is clear that the best way to go against Samsung's products is using outdated HW platforms, running an OS with little traction overall in the smart phone market space... makes perfect sense.


What's your alternative? Because thats the same platform that has kept Nokia alive and even brought them to profitability.

HTC is at the point where they need real solutions. One with a chance of working. How wouldn't quarterly cash infusions from Microsoft, matched marketing, and engineering resources not help HTC?

Nokia outsold HTC and is poised to go even further in Q2, so how is this something that isn't beneficial to HTC?

HTC could save itself and in turn a lot of jobs if does what would be hypothetically mutually beneficial for both parties. In my opinion.

The alternative is staying their current course, as cash strapped as they are. Try to compete on marketing, sourcing of components, hiring of talent, and all that's associated with a successful product launch all without any comparable help from Google.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Nelson
by tylerdurden on Wed 22nd May 2013 23:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Nelson"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Perhaps you're conveniently forgetting that there are more android vendors other than HTC and samsung, and that HTC actually produces Windows Phones.

Furthermore, a big contributor to nokia's recent (bare) profitability were financial transactions (liquidation of physical assets mainly). Their product revenues have been lackluster, and they did just post a 190 million net lost in the recent quarter (now they are out of assets to squeeze).


Also, I'd be more careful when gloating about market share gains. Since Nokia experienced the fastest collapse in market share of any mobile handset maker in history, while transitioning to windows phone; 62% drop per year from 2010 to 2012.

So I fail to see how it can be spun as good business decision having to compete with other vendors for 4% of the market (WP's overall share), vs ducking it out with some of the same vendors for over half of the market.

Nokia should have produced WP and Android devices, and let the market sort it out. Rather than just tie their fortunes to a single albatross around their neck (which just like android is out of their control, or perhaps even more so).

Edited 2013-05-22 23:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3