Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 26th Jun 2013 14:12 UTC
Linux "This document outlines the set of requirements and guidelines for file and directory placement under the Linux operating system according to those of the FSSTND v2.3 final (January 29, 2004) and also its actual implementation on an arbitrary system. It is meant to be accessible to all members of the Linux community, be distribution independent and is intended to discuss the impact of the FSSTND and how it has managed to increase the efficiency of support interoperability of applications, system administration tools, development tools, and scripts as well as greater uniformity of documentation for these systems."
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Fedora for the rescue
by SeeM on Wed 26th Jun 2013 23:31 UTC
SeeM
Member since:
2011-09-10

# ls -l
bin -> usr/bin
lib -> usr/lib
sbin -> usr/sbin

We have to start somewhere, but I fear that those links will have to stay for the next 20 yeas.

The good thing is all that mess is on the root partition, which doesn't interest users that much. Mounting is no longer a problem (even media and mnt dirs are no longer required, since it goes to /run/mount/username now), /dev is maintaned by udev and /home is often on another partition. Only /etc is still going to be important and it's mess, but so much software depends on that mess, that is impossible to solve this.

Edited 2013-06-26 23:33 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Fedora for the rescue
by Delgarde on Thu 27th Jun 2013 02:55 in reply to "Fedora for the rescue"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

# ls -l
bin -> usr/bin
lib -> usr/lib
sbin -> usr/sbin

We have to start somewhere, but I fear that those links will have to stay for the next 20 yeas.


The /lib and /sbin links could probably be removed without much fuss - there's little software that actually cares about those directories specifically.

The tricky one is /bin, since there's a billion scripts out there starting with #!/bin/sh or #!/bin/perl that would need to be modified for it to work. Not to mention tools (like autotools, for instance) that *generate* such scripts.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Fedora for the rescue
by FishB8 on Thu 27th Jun 2013 04:06 in reply to "RE: Fedora for the rescue"
FishB8 Member since:
2006-01-16

Wouldn't recommend it. /lib is where the kernel modules are kept. You would have a very hard time booting if no /lib is to be found.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Fedora for the rescue
by Soulbender on Thu 27th Jun 2013 09:23 in reply to "RE: Fedora for the rescue"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Why not put everything in /bin, /sbin and /lib? I mean, if you're going to change this why even bother with /usr? You could just move /usr/local to /local.
What's so important about /usr?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Fedora for the rescue
by Soulbender on Thu 27th Jun 2013 09:19 in reply to "Fedora for the rescue"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

# ls -l
bin -> usr/bin
lib -> usr/lib
sbin -> usr/sbin


I'm curious, what real-world problem does this solve?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Fedora for the rescue
by SeeM on Thu 27th Jun 2013 10:27 in reply to "RE: Fedora for the rescue"
SeeM Member since:
2011-09-10

"# ls -l
bin -> usr/bin
lib -> usr/lib
sbin -> usr/sbin


I'm curious, what real-world problem does this solve?
"

Main goal is to have one less directories for "exe" files, and generally more clean /. There's too much in there now. I can leave with /etc, /usr, /home, /boot, but /srv, /mnt&/media, /bin&/sbin, /opt? I rarely even look inside of those, so why they are exposed so much? I simply type something in terminal (or #!/usr/bin/env) and hoping that PATH in shell config is OK. Or plug usb memory stick and click the icon.

I wonder if ever we'll have one dir for binaries in Linux and throw PATH away.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Fedora for the rescue
by phoenix on Thu 27th Jun 2013 17:30 in reply to "Fedora for the rescue"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

# ls -l
bin -> usr/bin
lib -> usr/lib
sbin -> usr/sbin


But, why move everything under /usr, instead of moving everything from /usr into the root?

Reply Parent Score: 2