Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 30th Dec 2013 18:48 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption

Jacob Applebaum's detailed technical 30c3 talk about the NSA's tools. Just watch this. Naming and shaming of just about every major technology company. This will blow your mind.

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RE[3]: Comment by ddc_
by mistersoft on Tue 31st Dec 2013 12:01 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ddc_"
mistersoft
Member since:
2011-01-05

Yep. And though I always agreed with the broad 'free software' principles of RMS, I've always thought he either went just a smidgen too far - or was slightly more dogmatic than necessary. But no, he was 100% right, (I'm still 'OK' with existense of some proprietary softwares at the local and function specific level), but OS's and BIOS's, Firmwares, both Home and Infrastructure routers and other network equipment - need to be running OPEN and regularly inspected code. For OS's - it needs to at least be the boot code, network stacks (wired and all varieties of wireless) and security code - other stuff and applications could maybe remain closed. Not the kernel though

Would pressure from consumers on the Microsoft's and Apples ever force them to change at all? Pressure from angry corporations or even non-UK non-US governments then?

Edited 2013-12-31 12:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by ddc_
by bitwelder on Tue 31st Dec 2013 13:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ddc_"
bitwelder Member since:
2010-04-27

Yep. And though I always agreed with the broad 'free software' principles of RMS, I've always thought he either went just a smidgen too far - or was slightly more dogmatic than necessary. But no, he was 100% right...

Besides, especially on subjects like these where there are strong interests involved, you sometimes just need to ask 1000 to receive 100.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by ddc_
by WorknMan on Wed 1st Jan 2014 02:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ddc_"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

but OS's and BIOS's, Firmwares, both Home and Infrastructure routers and other network equipment - need to be running OPEN and regularly inspected code.


Honestly, I don't think it would matter that much in regard to the network stuff. If you're sending something across the wire, it's eventually going to end up on somebody else's server, where the NSA and their ilk will have free reign of that data. It would be like sending something through snail mail, taking great pains to make sure nobody has access to the contents of the package before you send it, but when it passes through the post office, then it's there for anyone to inspect.

Better to make sure you encrypt anything that's super-sensitive with open source tools, and just assume the rest of it is publicly accessible information (which it pretty much is anyway). Basically what I'm saying is that when it comes to physical stuff, you don't really have to protect ALL of it (for example, you wouldn't set up a security system to make sure nobody steals the lawn chairs off of your back porch) - just the stuff that is most valuable. I'm basically the same way with 'digital' stuff.

Edited 2014-01-01 02:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Comment by ddc_
by ddc_ on Wed 1st Jan 2014 09:07 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by ddc_"
ddc_ Member since:
2006-12-05

Specially crafted firmware may compromise your encryption efforts.

Reply Parent Score: 3