Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Jan 2014 10:06 UTC
Windows

Paul Thurrott on the next version of Windows and the future of the platform.

In some ways, the most interesting thing about Threshold is how it recasts Windows 8 as the next Vista. It's an acknowledgment that what came before didn't work, and didn't resonate with customers. And though Microsoft will always be able to claim that Windows 9 wouldn't have been possible without the important foundational work they had done first with Windows 8 - just as was the case with Windows 7 and Windows Vista - there's no way to sugarcoat this. Windows 8 has set back Microsoft, and Windows, by years, and possibly for good.

With even Paul Thurrott claiming Windows is in trouble, it becomes virtually impossible to deny it is so.

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RE[4]: Microsoft in transition
by StuS on Tue 14th Jan 2014 01:22 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Microsoft in transition"
StuS
Member since:
2012-12-01

Given your experience, windows 8.1 isn't Vista - it's Linux! ;)

(Sorry, just spent some time upgrading Ubuntu from LTS to the latest normal release because docker (crapper) wanted me to bring in a backported kernel to LTS without mentioning this upgrade will break my ati driver, and therefore my X setup, and... yeah, if you upgrade and it breaks video, you got Linux ;) )

I am a Linux fanboy, but even I know it has it's issues (but has gotten a lot better!!)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Microsoft in transition
by lemur2 on Tue 14th Jan 2014 02:07 in reply to "RE[4]: Microsoft in transition"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Given your experience, windows 8.1 isn't Vista - it's Linux! ;)

(Sorry, just spent some time upgrading Ubuntu from LTS to the latest normal release because docker (crapper) wanted me to bring in a backported kernel to LTS without mentioning this upgrade will break my ati driver, and therefore my X setup, and... yeah, if you upgrade and it breaks video, you got Linux ;) )

I am a Linux fanboy, but even I know it has it's issues (but has gotten a lot better!!)


You are doing it wrong IMO. Get a live USB of the new version and boot it, then test that it works (while running from the USB) before you commit to it.

Assuming you have kept user's home directories on a separate partition (as is the recommendation for Linux), having tested the new version then you can simply re-format the root partition and install the new version to the hard disk in place of the previous version, safe in the knowledge that it works.

By all means update an existing installation, but I recommend don't upgrade an existing installation but rather just install the newer versions (after first testing it).

Reply Parent Score: 1

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

How is is acceptable for an OS update to complete bork what was working?

Windows doesn't do it, unless there is something fundamental (lack of 16bit support, requires a driver model that doesn't exist, or uses undocumented APIs). Windows program work ... hell even drivers work well between versions.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Microsoft in transition
by Nth_Man on Tue 14th Jan 2014 21:28 in reply to "RE[5]: Microsoft in transition"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

I recommend don't upgrade an existing installation but rather just install the newer versions (after first testing it).

I recommend the same. I even have two versions of Kubuntu in every computer: the current and the old one, each one in their own partition.

This way if the current Linux installation would fail, I would still have the prior one. The former Linux installation is also available with its configuration files, and so they can be consulted later, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 2

woegjiub Member since:
2008-11-25

Ubuntu had always been like that for me - every upgrade, something would break.


Ironically, since swapping to Arch, I've had no such problems.
The only admining I've had to do has been:
Follow the installation guide.
Install Yaourt
yaourt -Syua (~once per week)

0 issues, and I've been running it for as long as I had Ubuntu. I don't know if it's a result of their extended kernel review time, the switch to systemd, or the stabilising of the vanilla linux stack, but it's been without flaw.
For a "bleeding edge", rolling release distro to be doing so much better than Canonical speaks volumes about them.

Reply Parent Score: 2