Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Jan 2014 20:33 UTC
Apple

Thirty years ago, Apple introduced the Macintosh with the promise to put the creative power of technology in everyone's hands. It launched a generation of innovators who continue to change the world. This 30-year timeline celebrates some of those pioneers and the profound impact they've made.

Apple is also asking what your first Mac experience was. For me, it was a computer I had saved up for for a long time. Back in those days - around 2002-2003 - the Mac was virtually non-existent here in The Netherlands (or at least in the area where I lived), and the only place I'd ever seen Macs was at the dental department. Colourful iMacs - fun machines.

In any case, I was intrigued, and eventually bought an iMac G4 800Mhz. In my view, the most beautiful design the iMac ever had, but mine eventually died of a logic board failure within a few years (a notorious problem). I still think they're beautiful little machines, and would love to have the ultimate G4 iMac.

After that first iMac, I owned several Macs - an original iMac, a PowerBook G4 15", a PowerMac G4 dual 450Mhz, a Cube, my current iMac from 2012, and my favourite, a 12.1" iBook G4. There's one Mac I really want to add to my collection as soon as possible: the iBook G3/466 Special Edition. If you have one of these and would like to get rid of it - let me know.

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theinonen
Member since:
2009-10-06

For music production Atari ST was much more influental system than the Macintosh ever was and the software many people use today on Macs to make music actually originates from the Atari ST. Ataris of the day could also be used for DTP just fine.

And I would be real surprised if the thing that actually got people into electronic music was not tracker music on Amigas and Atari STs.


Also 20 years ago I do not thing many people used Apple for any serious video production as there were many bigger names still in business. If you were making special effects to movie and there was a choice between Apple and SGI systems, I doubt many would have chosen Apple for that kind of work, as it would have been like eating soup with a fork.

Edited 2014-01-28 07:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

ezraz Member since:
2012-06-20

For music production Atari ST was much more influental system than the Macintosh ever was and the software many people use today on Macs to make music actually originates from the Atari ST. Ataris of the day could also be used for DTP just fine.

And I would be real surprised if the thing that actually got people into electronic music was not tracker music on Amigas and Atari STs.


Also 20 years ago I do not thing many people used Apple for any serious video production as there were many bigger names still in business. If you were making special effects to movie and there was a choice between Apple and SGI systems, I doubt many would have chosen Apple for that kind of work, as it would have been like eating soup with a fork.




Atari ST was influential but it was a disaster as a platform. Atari was dead before that machine even shipped. The built in MIDI and early decent sound chip is what set it apart, but no pro studios were mixing records on Atari ST's. ST's more than likely lived in electronic musicians' studios, next to their keyboard rig.

The Mac with pro-tools passed Atari's in the pro audio market in no time. ST's are like the model T's of audio - a neat early proof of concept, but that was a dead end we all knew it.

Atari's next best machine was the Amiga, which was sold to Commodore and then killed slightly slower than the ST line. With that video card and routing, the Amigas got a hold in broadcast graphics and CGI. But those things crashed more than macs and the business end also got f'ed up.

I agree that Apple didn't compete with SGI back then. An SGI machine was a specialized beast, whereas the mac could still help your little sister type her paper.

Don't forget about the professional "daily" users, not just high-end hollywood stuff. Local media and corporate media went to mac production chains as soon as apple or avid added enough features.

Reply Parent Score: 1

theinonen Member since:
2009-10-06

By the way, Digidesign Soundtools was also available for Atari and if I am not mistaken it later became Pro Tools.

Reply Parent Score: 1

benytocamela Member since:
2013-05-16

For music production Atari ST was much more influental system than the Macintosh ever was


Not quite. Atari was a very popular low cost platform because of its MIDI capabilities. But it was pants for other parts of the music production/recording pipeline. Same applies to any other platform, Mac included. E.g. there were some high end music systems built around the Macintosh which dominated the music industry for a while, which were out of reach of most struggling musicians. But by the late 90s and early 00s, MacOS was one of the, if not THE, dominant music production platform. The amount of SW/HW running on Classic MacOS was one of the main pain points during the transition to OSX. It turns out that as crappy as MacOS was, it was very good platform for supporting low latency HW subsystems which are crucial for music production/recording.



Also 20 years ago I do not thing many people used Apple for any serious video production as there were many bigger names still in business. If you were making special effects to movie and there was a choice between Apple and SGI systems, I doubt many would have chosen Apple for that kind of work, as it would have been like eating soup with a fork.


I think you may be confusing "video production" with "CGI," which refer to 2 different aspects of the AV industry. For a few years mac was the main platform for low/middle end non-linear video editing, mainly because of Avid and Premiere both of which were launch on Mac initially.

Reply Parent Score: 2