Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th May 2014 17:48 UTC
Microsoft

Microsoft has unveiled a new Surface Pro 3 device at a press event in New York City today. Like the previous Surface tablets it still includes a kickstand, but Surface chief Panos Panay says it's designed to remove the conflict of buying a laptop or a tablet. The kickstand on the device is multi-stage, and the device is just 9.1mm thick. "This is the tablet than can replace your laptop," claims Panay. Microsoft has moved to a 12-inch screen on the Surface Pro 3 with a 3:2 aspect ratio and HD display, but the new tablet also has thin bezels with a silver and black design. Microsoft will start accepting pre-orders on the Surface Pro 3 tomorrow starting at $799.

It's an amazing piece of hardware, and Microsoft really deserves praise for the amount of power it has managed to pack in such a slim and light package, but the same could be said of the previous Surface Pro - and that one hasn't exactly taken the market by storm either. The problem, is software - something Microsoft was remarkably hush-hush about during the unveiling.

Something else Microsoft was hush-hush about: Windows RT and ARM. No new RT/ARM-based Surface device, and I have a feeling that particular experiment has met its end today.

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RE[6]: amazing?
by unclefester on Thu 22nd May 2014 03:59 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: amazing?"
unclefester
Member since:
2007-01-13

So what you're saying is I can get an inferior product for less money? Shocking!


IMHO an ultrabook is generally an inferior product at a much higher price. You get things you don't need (ludicrously overpowered i5/i7 CPU), greatly reduced storage, a much smaller screen with resolution 'improvements' you don't really notice and a teeny weeny little keyboard that doesn't suit touch typing. The only real upside is reduced weight. Basically you pay a lot of money for a massively overpowered 'netbook'.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: amazing?
by leos on Thu 22nd May 2014 05:20 in reply to "RE[6]: amazing?"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

"So what you're saying is I can get an inferior product for less money? Shocking!


IMHO an ultrabook is generally an inferior product at a much higher price. You get things you don't need (ludicrously overpowered i5/i7 CPU), greatly reduced storage, a much smaller screen with resolution 'improvements' you don't really notice and a teeny weeny little keyboard that doesn't suit touch typing. The only real upside is reduced weight. Basically you pay a lot of money for a massively overpowered 'netbook'.
"

Obviously you have never used an ultra book.
Compared to a low cost netbook or cheap laptop, ultra books are:
1. Much faster. How you imagine this is a disadvantage I have no idea. Even for just browsing the web you will notice this difference especially on a Windows system
2. Much faster storage. Worlds of difference between a system with an SSD and one with a spinning hard drive.
3. Much better screens. It's not just resolution (although that certainly helps), it's also viewing angles, colour reproduction, etc.
4. Much better battery life. Macbook air lasts 12 hours (yes not technically an ultra book but it spawned the genre).
5. Less weight, better build quality.

So no, there is no logical world where a netbook is a better product.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: amazing?
by unclefester on Thu 22nd May 2014 06:04 in reply to "RE[7]: amazing?"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

"[q]So what you're saying is I can get an inferior product for less money? Shocking!


IMHO an ultrabook is generally an inferior product at a much higher price. You get things you don't need (ludicrously overpowered i5/i7 CPU), greatly reduced storage, a much smaller screen with resolution 'improvements' you don't really notice and a teeny weeny little keyboard that doesn't suit touch typing. The only real upside is reduced weight. Basically you pay a lot of money for a massively overpowered 'netbook'.
"

Obviously you have never used an ultra book.
Compared to a low cost netbook or cheap laptop, ultra books are:
1. Much faster. How you imagine this is a disadvantage I have no idea. Even for just browsing the web you will notice this difference especially on a Windows system
2. Much faster storage. Worlds of difference between a system with an SSD and one with a spinning hard drive.
3. Much better screens. It's not just resolution (although that certainly helps), it's also viewing angles, colour reproduction, etc.
4. Much better battery life. Macbook air lasts 12 hours (yes not technically an ultra book but it spawned the genre).
5. Less weight, better build quality.

So no, there is no logical world where a netbook is a better product. [/q]


I actually implied that ultrabooks were generally inferior to full size laptops. The only advantage they have is low weight.

Unless you are a power user that does a lot of travelling an ultrabook is an emotion based choice [Does anyone really need 12 hours battery life?]. For most people an ultrabook is either a very expensive laptop with a very small screen or a grossly overpriced netbook. That is why ultrabooks are still niche products.

The speed of opening webpages is controlled by your internet connection speed and the speed of the server. A fast CPU won't sped up a slow loading webpage.[One of my very impressionable friends bought an i7 Macbook Pro. Yet he is only browsing web pages on super slow public wireless networks. Totally irrational.]

Most of the real world response of an ultrabook is due to an SSD not a fast processor. If your low end Athlon mobile APU is ticking over at 5-10% an i7 is not going to make a hell of a lot of difference.

In the near future SSDs will be cheap enough to be offered on base models so the ukltrabook advantage will largely be lost.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: amazing?
by smashIt on Thu 22nd May 2014 08:11 in reply to "RE[7]: amazing?"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

yes not technically an ultra book but it spawned the genre


not even close
they were called subminiature notebooks and exist almost as long as notebooks exist (remember toshibas libreto-series?)

Reply Parent Score: 3