Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th Jul 2017 19:49 UTC
AMD

So far all the products launched with Zen have aimed at the upper echelons of the PC market, covering mainstream, enthusiasts and enterprise customers - areas with high average selling prices to which a significant number of column inches are written. But the volume segment, key for metrics such as market share, are in the entry level products. So far the AMD Zen core, and the octo-core Zeppelin silicon design, has been battling on the high-end. With Ryzen 3, it comes to play in the budget market.

AnandTech's review and benchmarks of the new low-end Ryzen 3 processors.

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Binning
by Treza on Fri 28th Jul 2017 22:52 UTC
Treza
Member since:
2006-01-11

I find quite remarquable that all the RYZEN 3/5/7 chips are made from the same die, iirc "Zeppelin", with different binning, disabled cores or multithreading.

The production cost of the lowest end R3 is the same as the highest performance R7, except for the bundled cooler.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Binning
by kriston on Sat 29th Jul 2017 03:56 in reply to "Binning"
kriston Member since:
2007-04-11

Well, it's well-known practice to do this either for marketing reasons but also for practical reasons. Intel has always done this at least as far back as differentiating CeLeron SKUs from Pentiums. If one of the cache modules has a flaw but the rest of the chip is fine, sell it as a feature-reduced chip for less money. The same with multiple cores and heat-related failures in certain CPU modules.

At least in the old days, most of the time the flaws are in the cache, so reduce cache and turn off HyperThreading. I wonder what AMD's official word is on this practice for modern ryzen CPUs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Binning
by grat on Sat 29th Jul 2017 04:55 in reply to "RE: Binning"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

I seem to recall the 486SX was a 486DX that failed QC, so they burned out the links to the Floating Point Unit.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Binning
by bassbeast on Sat 29th Jul 2017 06:42 in reply to "Binning"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

AMD has done this for years, for example the Zosma Phenom quad was a Phenom hexacore with 2 cores turned off and there are Athlon X4s that you can attempt to reactivate the cache on which turns them into Phenoms.

And IIRC the FX chips are all a single chip...the FX-8350. They are either binned faster or slower or have some cores disabled but they are all just 8350s, even the "e" series were just "gold binned" FX-8350s that would run at 95w with just a slightly lower clock speed.

You really have to give AMD credit for doing that, their yields must be insane by just making one chip and then disabling cores/cache to fit different markets, no wasted chips, no need for multiple lines, quite smart.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Binning
by Alfman on Sat 29th Jul 2017 08:28 in reply to "RE: Binning"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

bassbeast,

AMD has done this for years, for example the Zosma Phenom quad was a Phenom hexacore with 2 cores turned off and there are Athlon X4s that you can attempt to reactivate the cache on which turns them into Phenoms.


I once bought two athlon XP desktop processors and used conductive ink to repair the broken traces that differentiated them from athlon MP that could be used in dual CPU boards.

You can see those tiny traces in these pictures:
http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K7/TYPE-Athlon%20MP.html

Edited 2017-07-29 08:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Binning
by unclefester on Sun 30th Jul 2017 01:08 in reply to "Binning"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

I find quite remarquable that all the RYZEN 3/5/7 chips are made from the same die, iirc "Zeppelin", with different binning, disabled cores or multithreading.


Car makers have being doing the same thing with their engines for a century. They deliberately downgrade performance (lower compression, rev limiting, smaller displacement etc) on cheaper models to encourage buyers to upgrade. Now that turbo engines are common they can tweak the engine management software to alter the power output by a huge margin for almost zero cost.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Binning
by Alfman on Sun 30th Jul 2017 01:59 in reply to "RE: Binning"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

unclefester,

Car makers have being doing the same thing with their engines for a century. They deliberately downgrade performance (lower compression, rev limiting, smaller displacement etc) on cheaper models to encourage buyers to upgrade. Now that turbo engines are common they can tweak the engine management software to alter the power output by a huge margin for almost zero cost.


This is probably also why they lobby for the DMCA to apply to cars.


http://www.autoblog.com/2015/04/20/automakers-gearheads-car-repairs...

In any other "legit" copyright case I'd say making your own changes to your own legal copy would not reasonably be construed as an infringement, but the DMCA made it illegal merely to circumvent copyright protections even if you aren't otherwise violating any copyrights. And this is why manufacturers became fond of the DMCA, but the fact that this keeps happening just highlights how this was always just bad legislation, we should be repealing that!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Binning
by Lennie on Mon 31st Jul 2017 16:25 in reply to "Binning"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Much more remarkable is why would you call something your company makes "Zeppelin". They didn't have the best name in the past.

Especially for a company (AMD) which is known for having had products which heating problems.

Reply Parent Score: 2