Linked by Trent Townsend on Wed 18th Jan 2006 22:03 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives DragonFly BSD 1.4 is the third major release of Matthew Dillon's fork of the FreeBSD operating system, and significant progress has been made towards reaching many of the project's numerous goals. New in this release include a more up to date version of the GNU Compiler Collection (required due to the incread use of thread local storage in DragonFly), an import of NetBSD's Citrus code (Comprehensive I18N Framework Towards Respectable Unix Systems), major reworking of all core subsystems in preparation for removing the MP lock, rewrites of various VFS related code and many updated drivers, frameworks and contributed programs.
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RE[3]: where's the beef
by Lazarus on Thu 19th Jan 2006 07:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: where's the beef"
Lazarus
Member since:
2005-08-10

¨Frankly the author was unqualified to write anything.¨

Oh I wouldn say that, but I am certainly not qualified to write some of the things you´d likely be interested in (really hardcore low-level stuff), so I´ve saved myself the embarrasment of even trying.

¨Frankly, I think the most educational bits now are Rayner (sp?) comments.¨

I agree with that statement, and quite frankly it is his comments that keep me reading the comment section, he is informative and does not whine.

Please by all means, feel free to submit something yourself if you don´t like the things that get posted here. I am looking forward to seeing what you´re capable of ;^)

Edited 2006-01-19 07:04

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: where's the beef
by CaptainPinko on Thu 19th Jan 2006 07:27 in reply to "RE[3]: where's the beef"
CaptainPinko Member since:
2005-07-21

In my family we always said 'your best doesn't mean it's good enough' and I could write something but I don't want to put more tripe out on the internet. I've written a few rough drafts over the last two years as to why Java is the ideal programming language for beginners but I realised it wouldn't really fit here and it'd be too long for most people to read.

The only other thing I think I could write about is mode/context switches and why they screw over microkernels... but even then anyone who has a CompSci or SoftEng BSc or any technical college should already know that so it'd be like "bringing salt to the ocean."

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: where's the beef
by Lazarus on Thu 19th Jan 2006 07:42 in reply to "RE[4]: where's the beef"
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

¨I've written a few rough drafts over the last two years as to why Java is the ideal programming language for beginners but I realised it wouldn't really fit here and it'd be too long for most people to read.¨

Maybe, but we will never know until we see it, and we haven´t had a decent Java story in a while. As people don ´t get good at something unless they practice it, it might do you some good to finnish it and post it anyway, regardless of whether or not you think you will do a terrible job.

Live and learn, right?

Reply Parent Score: 1

v RE[4]: where's the beef
by geopapl on Thu 19th Jan 2006 09:54 in reply to "RE[3]: where's the beef"
RE[5]: where's the beef
by Lazarus on Thu 19th Jan 2006 10:09 in reply to "RE[4]: where's the beef"
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

"No, you've got that backwards. If people don't like what you write, it doesn't mean that they should write something better. It means that you should stop writting."

Interesting idea. Pass.

Reply Parent Score: 1