Linked by on Wed 1st Feb 2006 19:53 UTC
Novell and Ximian A demonstration of the next release of Novell's Linux for desktops drew cheers and applause Wednesday, although the final version of the software is not expected for some months. Nat Friedman, the company's vice president of Linux desktop engineering, showed Novell Linux Desktop 10 playing videos and MP3 music files, and exchanging music and photos with an iPod and a digital camera, in a keynote presentation at the Solutions Linux conference and trade show on the outskirts of Paris.
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RE: Videos, MP3s?
by segedunum on Wed 1st Feb 2006 20:34 UTC in reply to "Videos, MP3s?"
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

Wow, he played videos and MP3s?! Say it isn't so!

Back up there cowboy. This is supposed to be an accomplishment? What am I missing, exactly?


Extremely sadly, and with some regret, I have to agree with you. Playing MP3s, viewing pictures and doing something, not completely special, but pre-planned with them - all using the next version of a distribution that isn't selling and that absolutely no one outside of Novell uses?! Yer, whatever. None of that stuff actually matters as well, just to make things worse.

I know there are some people with memories like goldfishes who keep coming back for more over many years to lap up some eye candy and hype that will never amount to anything, but I'm just not one of them. I am singularly, and totally, unimpressed with some peoples' "vision" for desktop Linux. Surely by now they, and others, would have realised that it just isn't going to work.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Videos, MP3s?
by leos on Wed 1st Feb 2006 20:53 in reply to "RE: Videos, MP3s?"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

I agree that what they demoed isn't anything to be excited about, but I don't think that the linux desktop vision (if that even exists) is not good. Having played with the Vista betas, I'm sure hoping that the linux desktop goes in the opposite direction.

I am singularly, and totally, unimpressed with some peoples' "vision" for desktop Linux.

What is your vision for desktop Linux?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Videos, MP3s?
by segedunum on Wed 1st Feb 2006 21:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Videos, MP3s?"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

What is your vision for desktop Linux?

Not this ;-). Dan Kegel has outlined an absolute tip of the iceberg as to what's wrong, and forking out for dodgy MP3 patent licenses, copying stuff to an iPod and copying pictures to a web site doesn't cover any of it.

It would simply take too long to explain, because it involves ignoring the desktop for a while and concentrating on trying to cement open source software's place on the server-side of things. And no, that hasn't happened. Want to know why people feel there should be a drop-in, totally compatible replacement for Exchange and people want desktop Linux to fit into an Active Directory network? There's your problem. You then build that infrastructure up to something usable that will make people ignore Windows Server, and that gives you the right open backdrop for developing an open source desktop and the right infrastructure to support it.

Boring I know, and not as exciting as playing a few MP3s, but there it is.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Videos, MP3s?
by abraxas on Thu 2nd Feb 2006 02:02 in reply to "RE: Videos, MP3s?"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

Extremely sadly, and with some regret, I have to agree with you. Playing MP3s, viewing pictures and doing something, not completely special, but pre-planned with them - all using the next version of a distribution that isn't selling and that absolutely no one outside of Novell uses?!

I can only wonder why you wouldn't think this is a good thing. One of the biggest complaints about Linux on the desktop was the inability to do just these types of things. Sure they seem trivial but it is one less obstacle in the way of acceptance on the desktop. If you haven't noticed Linux has been gaining popularity on the desktop for years now. I'm glad joe user can finally do things like this. After all computers have become more and more about media like music, movies, and pictures, in recent years. This along with the development of XGL will hopefully put Linux on par (and even surpass in some areas) Windows and OSX.

I guess it's just kinda funny that when Apple allows you to do all these things in such an easy way people rave but when Linux does it it is unimpressive.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Videos, MP3s?
by segedunum on Thu 2nd Feb 2006 09:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Videos, MP3s?"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

One of the biggest complaints about Linux on the desktop was the inability to do just these types of things.

I've been able to do those things on a Linux distribution for years, and it's only recently that it has suddenly become a problem. What's new now?

Basically what's happened is that in trying to get people to move internally to the NLD Novell have encountered problems with a lot of people using their computers for things that, strictly speaking, they shouldn't be doing. Namely, plugging their iPod in, copying MP3s, doing things with their photo collection and playing with eye candy in the form of wibbly, wobbly windows. Perhaps they're trying desperately to convince people that desktop Linux will work for them, trying to convince them to actually use it and/or get them to use Gnome. Who knows?

It's nice that people can do those things, but considering what the NLD is actually supposed to do and what it's aimed for as a product this demonstration seems somewhat out of sync.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Videos, MP3s?
by abraxas on Fri 3rd Feb 2006 16:14 in reply to "RE[2]: Videos, MP3s?"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

I've been able to do those things on a Linux distribution for years, and it's only recently that it has suddenly become a problem. What's new now?


You're not joe user now are you, and I'm sure doing these types of things required some setup in the past. I think you're missing the point.


Basically what's happened is that in trying to get people to move internally to the NLD Novell have encountered problems with a lot of people using their computers for things that, strictly speaking, they shouldn't be doing. Namely, plugging their iPod in, copying MP3s, doing things with their photo collection and playing with eye candy in the form of wibbly, wobbly windows.


You're joking right?

It's nice that people can do those things, but considering what the NLD is actually supposed to do and what it's aimed for as a product this demonstration seems somewhat out of sync.

So tell me then, what are they aiming for?

Reply Parent Score: 1