Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Dec 2017 19:46 UTC
Legal

Net neutrality is dead - at least for now. In a 3-2 vote today, the Federal Communications Commission approved a measure to remove the tough net neutrality rules it put in place just two years ago. Those rules prevented internet providers from blocking and throttling traffic and offering paid fast lanes. They also classified internet providers as Title II common carriers in order to give the measure strong legal backing.

Today's vote undoes all of that. It removes the Title II designation, preventing the FCC from putting tough net neutrality rules in place even if it wanted to. And, it turns out, the Republicans now in charge of the FCC really don’t want to. The new rules largely don’t prevent internet providers from doing anything. They can block, throttle, and prioritize content if they wish to. The only real rule is that they have to publicly state that they’re going to do it.

Nobody wanted the FCC to vote like this. Public support for net neutrality is massive. The only reason this is happening is pure, unbridled corruption at the very root of the American political system.

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It's not over
by Dasher42 on Fri 15th Dec 2017 00:44 UTC
Dasher42
Member since:
2007-04-05

There are sixty days for the US Congress to override the FCC via the Congressional Review Act with a simple majority. After recent events in Alabama and the turmoil in the Republican Party, some congress-critters might feel skittish about tying themselves to highly unpopular Trump administration officials and their actions.

https://gizmodo.com/wait-can-congress-stop-the-fcc-from-trampling-ne...

Edited 2017-12-15 00:44 UTC

Reply Score: 7

RE: It's not over
by Odwalla on Fri 15th Dec 2017 12:30 in reply to "It's not over"
Odwalla Member since:
2006-02-01

It's actually longer than sixty days. It's sixty days *after* the next Congressional Review is published. When the 'Make it all Title II' rule was voted on in 2015 the next Congressional Review wasn't slated to be published for six weeks, so that window was 102 days. A large number of states Attorneys Generals, the EFF, and the ACLU are preparing lawsuits. None of them will be filed until the next Congressional Review is published...legal procedures and all that.

So while things might appear quiet in the coming weeks, there is still opposition work to this awful ruling occurring.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: It's not over
by lsatenstein on Fri 15th Dec 2017 14:44 in reply to "It's not over"
lsatenstein Member since:
2006-04-07

The ISPs want to hit Google, the Music stores, Amazon, Facebook and other profitable business. The ISPs did not create those businesses, but now they want a part of it.

The reason ISPs are in the business, is due to profit. They make a profit, even if it is only 25cents per day per household. Wiring up households is not a losing business, otherwise they would not do it.

Neutrality does not mean neutrality for rates. You are going to start paying for accesses. Guarantee that this will happen. Packages, just like Cable TV.

Some towns and cities are beginning to install fibre and own the fibre, They do not plan to do throttling. They want to make running a city a priority, and the internet for Fire, Police, Medical, and city infastructur management, affordable. If you are on Verizon, or AT&T or other, the entrance to your home/business will not change if you change providers.

Time for municipalities to be responsible for the internet access and municipal distribution

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: It's not over
by Alfman on Fri 15th Dec 2017 18:20 in reply to "RE: It's not over"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Isatenstein,

The ISPs want to hit Google, the Music stores, Amazon, Facebook and other profitable business. The ISPs did not create those businesses, but now they want a part of it.

The reason ISPs are in the business, is due to profit. They make a profit, even if it is only 25cents per day per household. Wiring up households is not a losing business, otherwise they would not do it.


Net neutrality supporters often focus on the ISPs abusing their monopoly, which is valid. However I actually think the biggest threats may not necessarily originate from monopolistic ISPs, but instead from big online internet companies that would like to become effective monopolies online.

Just think, instead of trying to draw customers by making their products competitive, online companies could start to bribe ISPs to throttle and block their competition even if the ISP had no profit motive to block them before. Without net neutrality, this type of private arrangement between ISPs and the big services providers becomes legal.

Of course, the largest companies have cash and bargaining power, but small companies will face increasing barriers to entry for the same service.

Reply Parent Score: 4