Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Dec 2017 19:46 UTC
Legal

Net neutrality is dead - at least for now. In a 3-2 vote today, the Federal Communications Commission approved a measure to remove the tough net neutrality rules it put in place just two years ago. Those rules prevented internet providers from blocking and throttling traffic and offering paid fast lanes. They also classified internet providers as Title II common carriers in order to give the measure strong legal backing.

Today's vote undoes all of that. It removes the Title II designation, preventing the FCC from putting tough net neutrality rules in place even if it wanted to. And, it turns out, the Republicans now in charge of the FCC really don’t want to. The new rules largely don’t prevent internet providers from doing anything. They can block, throttle, and prioritize content if they wish to. The only real rule is that they have to publicly state that they’re going to do it.

Nobody wanted the FCC to vote like this. Public support for net neutrality is massive. The only reason this is happening is pure, unbridled corruption at the very root of the American political system.

E-mail Print r 12   67 Comment(s)
Thread beginning with comment 652051
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Yes
by SojoPhoto on Fri 15th Dec 2017 12:45 UTC in reply to "RE: Yes"
SojoPhoto
Member since:
2011-12-08

You do realize that the FCC guy (I cannot remember his name) was appointed by Obama, right?

Reply Parent Score: -2

RE[3]: Yes
by Alfman on Fri 15th Dec 2017 13:46 in reply to "RE[2]: Yes"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

SojoPhoto,

You do realize that the FCC guy (I cannot remember his name) was appointed by Obama, right?


You do realize that when Obama was in office, we also criticized him for the revolving door and appointing industry insiders, right? Republicans don't have a monopoly on the revolving door, unfortunately.

It's kind of depressing to be an informed voter because you realize that both parties are incumbent and neither truly has the will to take corporations out of politics. Though there's no denying trump's corporate corruption is particularly nasty.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Yes
by Remiks on Fri 15th Dec 2017 13:46 in reply to "RE[2]: Yes"
Remiks Member since:
2009-08-25

>You do realize that the FCC guy (I cannot remember his name) was appointed by Obama, right?<

Ajit Pai -current FCC chairman- was appointed by Trump. Tom Wheeler -prvious FCC chairman- was appointed by Obama.

Get your facts right.

Edited 2017-12-15 13:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Yes
by Alfman on Fri 15th Dec 2017 14:08 in reply to "RE[3]: Yes"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Remiks,

Ajit Pai -current FCC chairman- was appointed by Trump. Tom Wheeler -prvious FCC chairman- was appointed by Obama.

Get your facts right.


SojoPhoto is referring to ajit pai's earlier stint at the FCC. This was prior to his job as an attorney for verizon and suing the FCC. He was originally hired for legal work at the FCC under the obama administration, apparently he was recommended by mitch mcconnell. Obviously making him the chairman is all trump's doing, and it's pretty clear he was chosen by trump because of his corrupt ties to the corporations the FCC is supposed to regulate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajit_Pai#Early_life_and_education
Between 2007 and 2011, Pai held several positions in the FCC's Office of General Counsel, serving most prominently as Deputy General Counsel. In this role, he had supervisory responsibility over several dozen lawyers in the Administrative Law Division and worked on a wide variety of regulatory and transactional matters involving the wireless, wireline, cable, Internet, media, and satellite industries.[1] In 2010, Pai was one of 55 individuals nationwide chosen for the 2011 Marshall Memorial Fellowship, a leadership development initiative of the German Marshall Fund of the United States.[1] Pai returned to the private sector in April 2011, working in the Washington, D.C., office of law firm Jenner & Block where he was a partner in the Communications Practice.

In 2011, Pai was then nominated for a Republican Party position on the Federal Communications Commission by President Barack Obama at the recommendation of Minority leader Mitch McConnell. He was confirmed unanimously by the United States Senate on May 7, 2012, and was sworn in on May 14, 2012, for a term that concluded on June 30, 2016.[1] Then Pai was designated chairman of the FCC by President Donald Trump in January 2017 for a five-year term.[17] He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate for the additional five-year term on October 2, 2017.[6]


Edited 2017-12-15 14:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3