.NET Archive

Microsoft’s Upcoming Vista To Support Legacy VB6 Apps

Will Microsoft's forthcoming Vista OS support legacy applications written in VB6? Microsoft plans to answer that question in detail about a month from now, a timeframe that happens to coincide with the one-year anniversary of a petition from developers asking for better support of the traditional VB environment during the emerging .NET era. But for now, MS is willing to say that when Vista goes out the door, Microsoft will extend mainstream support for the VB6 runtime by another six or seven years, through the end of the Vista lifecycle. The same won't be true, however, for the VB6 development environment, which left mainstream support for extended support in mid-2005.

How to Use Partial Classes in Visual Studio 2005

Partial classes permit splitting a single class, interface, or struct into multiple, separate files. There are several advantages to splitting these elements into many files, including permitting more than one developer to work on the same class. Paul Kimmel shows where partial classes are used and how you might use partial keywords to fine-tune your productivity.

ActiveState Discontinues Visual Perl, Python

"ActiveState has announced the end of engineering support for Visual Perl, Visual Python, and Visual XSLT, effective immediately. The plug-ins will not be updated for Visual Studio 2005, and there will be no further maintenance on the Visual Studio 2003- and 2002-compatible versions. Due to the necessary inclusion of Visual Studio integration code in Visual Perl, Visual Python, and Visual XSLT, the plug-ins will not be open-sourced."

Could Microsoft ‘Kill’ Python?

"How can Microsoft kill Python? When I say 'kill', I mean 'seriously damage the relevance of Python'. I don't mean that Microsoft, as some have suggested, will work on IronPython for a while, get people using it, then hijack the language by seriously changing the syntax of it and thereby breaking compatibility with CPython. So, how does this damage the relevance of Python? If Microsoft, who is investing considerable time and money to create a .Net implementation of Python, only refers to IronPython as a 'dynamic language' and only pushes it as a 'scripting language', many people will begin to assume that that's all that it is good for."

IronPython 0.9.5 Released

IronPython is the codename for an alpha release of the Python programming language for the .NET platform. It supports an interactive interpreter with fully dynamic compilation. It is well integrated with the rest of the framework and makes all .NET libraries easily available to Python programmers.

Generic Classes in C# 2.0

Code once. Use many. That's what generics are about. Called templates in C++, C# generics support separating code by algorithm and data structure. For example, the generic list means that you'll never again have to write a strongly typed collection. Paul Kimmel shows just how easy it is to define and use generics, long considered one of the most advanced and difficult idioms. This article is adapted from Paul Kimmel's book C# Express.

VS 2005, SQL Server 2005, .NET Framework 2.0 Released

Microsoft on Thursday released to manufacturing its Visual Studio 2005 and SQL Server 2005 products, previously known by the code names Whidbey and Yukon respectively. Officials at the company called the RTM of the technology a significant milestone on the road to the launch of Visual Studio 2005, SQL Server 2005 and BizTalk Server 2006. The .NET Framework 2.0 has also been released. All will be available via MSDN today.

IronPython 0.9.3 Released

IronPython is the codename for an alpha release of the Python programming language for the .NET platform. It supports an interactive interpreter with fully dynamic compilation. It is well integrated with the rest of the framework and makes all .NET libraries easily available to Python programmers.

Microsoft Driving Toward .Net Unity

Specialized programming languages and their supporting environments have always been tightly coupled: SQL and the database; business rules and the rules engine. It's tempting to wish for an überlanguage or one syntax to rule them all, but what really matters is a common environment. At its 2005 Professional Developers Conference, Microsoft showed that it's finally putting all of its eggs into the .Net basket.