Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 26th Mar 2006 23:53 UTC
Mac OS X Informit.com's very own Mac Reference Guide, Owen Linzmayer, again risks the slings and arrows of Apple's most ardent admirers with another look at how Tiger rubs him wrong. Take a look at "Ten More Things I Hate About Mac OS X" to see if you recognize any of your own pet peeves. Elsewhere on the same site, this chapter covers the initial installation and setup of Mac OS X Tiger, either as a fresh installation, or as an upgrade from a previous version. Detailed instructions are given to help you set your Mac up just how you want it.
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More peeves
by BladeMelbourne on Mon 27th Mar 2006 02:10 UTC
BladeMelbourne
Member since:
2005-07-10

9) Cut doesn't appear in context menus for files/directories. Copy, paste and duplicate are possible, but I often (several times a day) need to move files as I organise downloads. It is annoying to have to copy, paste, go back and delete the old copy.

10) No tree view in Finder. A tree view makes navigating file systems much more efficient. Especially when you have a couple of 250GB disks and ~1 million files. No Mac user should have to pay for a 3rd party program to do this. Explorer does it well. Xfe does it well. So does Konq. Why cant Finder?

Reply Score: 1

RE: More peeves
by Big Al on Mon 27th Mar 2006 03:11 in reply to "More peeves"
Big Al Member since:
2005-06-29

I'll second your number 10. I've had no problems with Windows, Linux and BeOS file navigation but I still have problems using the OS X way. This is about the only non-intuitive thing in the OS that I've encountered - everything else makes logical sense but the finder is just wierd.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: More peeves
by MikeGA on Mon 27th Mar 2006 09:58 in reply to "RE: More peeves"
MikeGA Member since:
2005-07-22

Interesting the way different people like to use their machines. I've always found the "tree" view in Windows to be irritating and confusing.

I much prefer the "column" view that the Finder provides (although I agree with the author that one should be able to have the columns auto-resize).

Still, like I say, everyone is different, so perhaps Apple should allow this "tree" view for navigation.

Regards the Cutting of files, I personally feel that Apple got this one right. With any document etc. (Windows or OS X) if you cut some text, but then overwrite the clipboard with something else, that text is lost.

Obviously, you don't really want to be able to "lose" a file this easily. Windows handles this by not really "cutting" the file until you "paste" it. So in reality, it is just a delayed "Move" command. Now, to my mind this is bad simply because it is inconsistent.

Apple's approach is simply to disallow "Cut" for files therefore avoiding both loss of file and inconsistent behaviour. For me, I find the whole spring-loaded-folders concept to be a perfectly adequate (perhaps even superior) alternative.

Although, like I said, everyone's different. Perhaps, there should be a box in the Finder prefs to enable cutting of files, with a warning about the risk.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Moving files across volumes easily
by Wowbagger on Mon 27th Mar 2006 03:12 in reply to "More peeves"
Wowbagger Member since:
2005-07-06

Simply drag the file while holding down the command key (the one with the Apple logo on).

As an indicator the overlaid (+) will dissappear, showing that the item you're dragging to a different volumen will not be copied, but moved. Which in effect is copying and automatically deleting the original when done.

While all other keyboard shortcuts can be found in the Help for the Finder, this one wasn't to be found there. strange.

Reply Parent Score: 2

dr_gonzo Member since:
2005-07-06

Dragging and dropping files within the same volume moves things by default. No need to hold down the command key.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: More peeves
by PowerMacX on Mon 27th Mar 2006 03:49 in reply to "More peeves"
PowerMacX Member since:
2005-11-06

9) Cut doesn't appear in context menus for files/directories.
Cut & Paste is the "Windows way", Mac favors the drag & drop approach. But I agree with you on this one, in many situations drag & drop doesn't work so well, the option should be there.

10) No tree view in Finder. A tree view makes navigating file systems much more efficient. Especially when you have a couple of 250GB disks and ~1 million files. No Mac user should have to pay for a 3rd party program to do this. Explorer does it well. Xfe does it well. So does Konq. Why cant Finder?

Because, IMHO Finder does it right ;)

You have three view modes: regular icon view, list view and column view.

- Column view is a lot more efficient for quickly navigating your folder hierarchy, a lot faster than manually expanding each folder on a "regular" folder tree view.

- List view as implemented in the Finder is actually a combination of what other systems call list view and a tree view. You can expand folders and subfolders just like in a regular tree view, but instead of just seeing the folders in one panel and the files in the other, you can see them together. If I want to quickly compare the contents of two folders with a few files, I can simply expand them both. With a regular tree view, I'm forced to see the files in a different panel, so I can only see the files in one folder at a time.

Also, don't forget you have the "drag and hold" method, that lets you drop a file as deep as you want in the folder hierarchy (the folders open automatically in sequence, after a short period of time, which you can customize).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: More peeves
by MikeGA on Mon 27th Mar 2006 10:00 in reply to "RE: More peeves"
MikeGA Member since:
2005-07-22

Oops, I'd forgotten one could use list view as if it were tree view. Although it does show everything, not just folders like Explorer does.

Also, with the "drag and hold" method (spring-loaded-folders really), you can also hit space whilst hovering over a folder, to open it up instantly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: More peeves
by BladeMelbourne on Mon 27th Mar 2006 12:33 in reply to "RE: More peeves"
BladeMelbourne Member since:
2005-07-10

Cut & Paste is the "Windows way", Mac favors the drag & drop approach. But I agree with you on this one, in many situations drag & drop doesn't work so well, the option should be there.

It's not just the Windows way - it is a pretty common approach. Says me who installed FC5 with Nautilus ;-)

10) No tree view in Finder.

Because, IMHO Finder does it right ;)

You have three view modes: regular icon view, list view and column view.


I'm not a Windows fanboy, but Windows has 4 modes - and it is more efficient than Finder - particularly in list mode. Some Linux file managers present a similar view to Finder ($home, etc) but also have a tree view to compensate.

- Column view is a lot more efficient for quickly navigating your folder hierarchy, a lot faster than manually expanding each folder on a "regular" folder tree view.
I have to disagree. It is ok in some senarios, but not many that I use.

- List view as implemented in the Finder is actually a combination of what other systems call list view and a tree view. You can expand folders and subfolders just like in a regular tree view, but instead of just seeing the folders in one panel and the files in the other, you can see them together. If I want to quickly compare the contents of two folders with a few files, I can simply expand them both. With a regular tree view, I'm forced to see the files in a different panel, so I can only see the files in one folder at a time.

This might be useful to you, but it isn't to me. 99% of my file operations are move or trash. Usually moving to a removal drive... with an organised hierarchy established with more than 10 years of data and structure.


Also, don't forget you have the "drag and hold" method, that lets you drop a file as deep as you want in the folder hierarchy (the folders open automatically in sequence, after a short period of time, which you can customize).

I found this by accident - yes it is neat (and visually too with the spring effect). But it isn't as convenient if you are going back and forth between directories, trying to find the most suitable location.

At the end of the day, the file operations I complete at work numerous times a day on Windows are far quicker and more efficient than the equivalent on a Mac. It is foolish to assume that all files owned by a person reside on the Desktop, or in $home, Applications, Documents, Movies, Music or Pictures. This is compounded when you connect a USB drive.

Finder also makes it more difficult to open a second instance - especially when clicking the Finder icon in the dock. Not impressed.

I guess what I am saying is that I can accomplish more with Explorer/Xfe/etc. quicker than can be done in Finder. This can be done without the keyboard too.

If 10.5 doesn't have a tree view, I'm going to replace OS X with Fedora.

Reply Parent Score: 1