Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 24th Apr 2006 20:26 UTC, submitted by elsewhere
Linux "The Free Standards Group will unveil Linux Standard Base 3.1, the first LSB version to include explicit Linux desktop application support, April 25 at the Desktop Linux Summit in San Diego. The standard has already been endorsed by Linux leaders Red Hat and Novell, along with other major Linux players such as AMD, Asianux, CA, Dell, HP, IBM, Intel, Mandriva, RealNetworks, Red Flag, and Turbolinux, according to the FSG."
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At last Qt
by jacquouille on Mon 24th Apr 2006 23:37 UTC
jacquouille
Member since:
2006-01-02

Good to see that, at last, the LSB includes Qt.

As the article says, the Qt licensing problem was solved six years ago. Qt has been GPLed for six years. Qt is GPL software just like any other piece of GPL software. Besides, the beauty of the GPL is that even if you don't want to trust Trolltech, you can still safely use Qt, because the GPL is so strict on contributing back that one can't play nasty with it. Concretely, if Trolltech went mad tomorrow, one could just fork Qt to keep it free. And don't say that this wouldn't happen, because the same scenario already happened with other projects (cf. the XOrg fork that followed the XF86 license change)

Keeping Qt outside the LSB was impossible to justify :
- Qt is Free-as-in-Freedom
- Qt is used by many applications, especially KDE, but not only
- Qt is a brilliant piece of software.

Reply Score: 5

RE: At last Qt
by elsewhere on Tue 25th Apr 2006 01:00 in reply to "At last Qt"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Besides, the beauty of the GPL is that even if you don't want to trust Trolltech, you can still safely use Qt, because the GPL is so strict on contributing back that one can't play nasty with it. Concretely, if Trolltech went mad tomorrow, one could just fork Qt to keep it free.

Actually, if Trolltech went "mad" tomorrow (ie. closed up shop, refused to further develop Qt, decided to close it off from GPL), then the current version of Qt would automatically revert to a BSD license under the terms of their legal agreement with the KDE foundation, and people could do almost WTF they want with it. Good to know we have options.

Keeping Qt outside the LSB was impossible to justify :
- Qt is Free-as-in-Freedom
- Qt is used by many applications, especially KDE, but not only
- Qt is a brilliant piece of software.


Well, I won't disagree, but by that criteria there are probably lots of libraries and applications that should be considered.

The biggest driver, from my understanding, was that KDE/Qt had pretty much established itself as a (not "the", just "a") de facto standard in the linux community, and the LSB is supposed to represent a baseline of common libraries, packages and standards already in place.

Reply Parent Score: 5