Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th May 2006 20:31 UTC, submitted by Joel Dahl
FreeBSD Linux may soon have a stronger open-source competitor on the desktop if FreeBSD's plans come to fruition. FreeBSD developer Scott Long told ZDNet UK on Thursday that the operating system, descended from the Unix derivative BSD, is "quickly approaching" feature parity with Linux. "Lots of work is going on to make FreeBSD more friendly on the desktop," Long said. "Within the year, we expect to have, or be near, parity with Linux."
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RE[4]: This is good news
by backdoc on Sat 13th May 2006 11:23 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: This is good news"
backdoc
Member since:
2006-01-14

There is some validity to what you're saying. But, try Googling for something like "starting postfix on archlinux" vs. "starting postfix on FreeBSD" or "installing mysql on slackware" vs. "installing mysql on FreeBSD".

I primarily use Ubuntu and Windows. And, searching for Ubuntu help is pretty productive (alot like FreeBSD's). But, the point is that it's not hit and miss in FreeBSD.

By any chance, have you only experienced the Linux side of your argument? Be honest . . .

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: This is good news
by zambizzi on Sat 13th May 2006 13:07 in reply to "RE[4]: This is good news"
zambizzi Member since:
2006-04-23

By any chance, have you only experienced the Linux side of your argument? Be honest . . .

By that do you mean, "Have you ever used *BSD?". The honest answer is yes. However I've never installed it nor have I had to maintain it. I couldn't imagine it being easier to do so (and to maintain) than Gentoo Linux.

I think I had said earlier that I was speaking based on what I've learned by keeping my ear to the ground and watching technology trends, not based on personal experience at the same depth.

But, the point is that it's not hit and miss in FreeBSD

Alright, there's one side of the arguement. Now, what happens if there's a particular package that you absolutely must have...it's critical to a working environment (to you, personally) - and it's broken in FreeBSD? Or, what if it's not supported? What if the particular configuration hinders your progress w/ that package somehow? *My* point was simply; you have more choice and can be as fickle as you want as a Linux user.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: This is good news
by dark child on Sat 13th May 2006 15:27 in reply to "RE[5]: This is good news"
dark child Member since:
2005-12-09

By that do you mean, "Have you ever used *BSD?". The honest answer is yes. However I've never installed it nor have I had to maintain it. I couldn't imagine it being easier to do so (and to maintain) than Gentoo Linux.

FreeBSD is lot easier to install than Gentoo. You can have a working FreeBSD base system in 5 or 10 minutes, whereas Gentoo will take you a lot longer. As for maintenance, I find it to be more or less the same but the ports system does not need a lot of tinkering with like portage e.g. there is no time wasted unmasking packages, you just install the version you wish and everything else is automatically sorted out.

Edited 2006-05-13 15:29

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: This is good news
by zambizzi on Sat 13th May 2006 15:52 in reply to "RE[5]: This is good news"
zambizzi Member since:
2006-04-23

Choosing to install Gentoo w/ a graphical installer or doing it manually is entirely voluntary. I choose to use a manual installation to get exactly the system configuration I prefer vs. accepting a particular set of packages that are pre-arranged by default, like other distros do. This is what sets Gentoo apart from any other other distro or operating system...it's simply a collection of packages that you assemble...you get exactly what you want and nothing more, if you don't want it.

I don't think the Gentoo manual installation is hard...the documentation is so simple and clear...all you really have to do is follow steps. I completed my laptop last night in under 2 hrs., minus compile-time. Today I have a beautiful, fast Gnome desktop.

The masking feature in Portage is quite nice...it helps make system maintenance stupid-proof for those people who will attempt to install something that isn't quite ready for prime time unknowingly. For those that do want that bleeding edge package...it's as simple as adding a line to a list in a packages.keywords and/or packages.unmask file.

This system is intuitive and smart, IMO.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: This is good news
by Morgan on Sat 13th May 2006 16:02 in reply to "RE[5]: This is good news"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I couldn't imagine it being easier to do so (and to maintain) than Gentoo Linux.

That depends on one's experience. To you, Gentoo obviously is easy and I salute you for that. To the average user, it is not. Take me, for example. I'm not a programmer; though I understand a bit about programming and have worked in a few languages I've never created anything of value and I don't really have a knack for it. I use Slackware as my Linux desktop, and I'm comfortable building from source but I'm not quite a "power user" by most definitions.

I've tried installing Gentoo; I even got it installed one time. It was far from easy and once I did get it installed it just seemed so obtuse and backwards to me. Why should I have to do all these things myself? I know, it allows me to have an OS that is perfectly meshed with my hardware and my way of using the OS. For someone like me, though, it's much less frustrating to find a distro (Slackware) that is already very close to my way of thinking and performs well with my hardware.

I've installed FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD. By far, the easiest was FreeBSD but it was only marginally easier than Gentoo. I did end up with a working system, and given time with it I'm sure I could get it to do everything I can get Slackware to. However, I'm keeping my eye on DesktopBSD (the distro) to see what they have in store for the future of Desktop BSD (the concept). I have a feeling it will be a very good thing for someone like me.

Reply Parent Score: 1