Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 31st May 2006 17:56 UTC, submitted by anonymous
Java In his Weblog entry last week, Jonathan Schwartz wrote that "despite the cynics, using a GPL license is very much on the table" as a possible option for open source Java. Schwartz also reported that Sun is making serious progress on open sourcing Java. "We're now making serious progress on open sourcing Java (and despite the cynics, using a GPL license is very much on the table), while focusing the debate on what matters most: not access to lines of code (that's already widely available), but ensuring compatibility," said Schwartz.
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derekmorr
Member since:
2005-09-25

Why would you want to compile it yourself? It already includes a JIT targeted for specific architectures. I don't see what benefit you'd get from compiling it yourself.

Reply Parent Score: 3

maxx_730 Member since:
2005-12-14

You obviously dont know Gentoo, it's a source based distro, those guys (want to?) compile everything theirselves, even if there absolutely isnt any gain from it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

derekmorr Member since:
2005-09-25

Exactly my point. I never understood the motivation behind Gentoo. OpenOffice is OpenOffice is OpenOffice. Why spend hours (or days on older systems) compiling it and all its dep's when you can just use a binary?

Reply Parent Score: 5

zizban Member since:
2005-07-06

Gentoo is nice, don't get me wrong, but there is very little benefit from compiling from source on x86 because the instructions are the. Your sytem wont be faster than my Debian system because you compiled from source everything.

Reply Parent Score: 1

unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

If you have the code you can fix bugs that annoys you.

As an example, for over SEVEN years, Swing GUI applications have been useless on Linux unless you have an US keyboard.

If you have some kind of European language various characters are untypable on Linux, what character it is depends on your language. On my Swedish keyboard it is the tilde character.

This bug is now finally fixed in the Sun JDK1.6 beta, and will hopefully, remain fixed in the final version to be shipped later this year. I doubt that major show stoppers for java GUI applications like this would have remained unfixed that long if java had been open source.

Other reasons to allow people to have access to the code is to make it possible to port it to other platforms. My guess is that FreeBSD have suffered from this in the past, or what if you want to port to another processor.

However, I'm not sure GPL is the answer for java. Even if Sun could use a dual license model for people that want to write closed source apps. GPL would prevent Sun from incorporating GPLed contributions from the free version without negotiating deals with each contributer.

Some kind of Apache like license would probably be more productive. That way Sun could cooperate with the Apache Harmony project. Sun have coperated succesfully with Apache in the past e.g. on servlets, so there is no reason it couldn't work for all of java.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

> If you have the code you can fix bugs that annoys you.

Um... You can.

Hundreds if not thousands of bug fixes have been contributed by users ever since Sun changed the licencing for Java last year. Users can now modify Java for internal use (provided they don't intentionally break compatibility) and also submit bug fixes to Sun for inclusion in Java.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

Why would you want to compile it yourself? It already includes a JIT targeted for specific architectures. I don't see what benefit you'd get from compiling it yourself.

How about because there is no Sun's JDK binary for Linux PPC and I have to use it? And no, IBM's JDK is not 100% compatible and has already given me headaches for a few weeks.

Reply Parent Score: 2