Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Jul 2006 21:16 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "Canonical's Ubuntu 6.06 LTS is an excellent Linux-based operating system - so excellent, in fact, that it not only earned eWEEK Labs' Analyst's Choice designation but has also become our clear favorite among Linux desktop distributions. This latest Ubuntu release, which became available in June, has won our ardor with a tight focus on desktop usability; an extremely active, helpful and organized user community; and a software installation and management framework that's unsurpassed on any OS platform."
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RE[2]: Ubuntu is a nice distro
by sbenitezb on Wed 19th Jul 2006 23:25 UTC
sbenitezb
Member since:
2005-07-22

"Ubuntu does not have root privileges by default and - as stated earlier - cannot have a 100% classical root account set up anymore."

Wrong, as I stated in a previous comment. Do some research, troll.

Reply Score: 1

RE[3]: Ubuntu is a nice distro
by arctic on Thu 20th Jul 2006 08:44 in reply to "RE[2]: Ubuntu is a nice distro"
arctic Member since:
2006-04-19

Sorry, if you don't know the difference between sudo and root, then there is nothing I can do for you. Especially if you call me a troll unnecessarily. Keep things civilized or don't post at all. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Ubuntu is a nice distro
by Murrell on Thu 20th Jul 2006 20:22 in reply to "RE[3]: Ubuntu is a nice distro"
Murrell Member since:
2006-01-04

Golly. So, given that the first thing I do when I setup a new machine here is delete the first user (we run LDAP/Kerberos/NFS);

sudo passwd
<enter new password twice>
logout

login as root
deluser tempuser

If this didn't work, I wouldn't be able to log in as root when machines are disconnected from the network, since all of sudo's information is retrieved from LDAP... Wait, gosh darn it, I can!

Now - if you were correct, this would be impossible right? Now, perhaps if you'd said something about sudo being the default mode of gksu, you might have a leg to stand on - but you didn't. Thus, it's obvious you've got no idea what you're talking about.

As it turns out, there's a boolean option in gconf ( /apps/gksu/sudo-mode ) that lets you switch the default behaviour of gksu between root and sudo mode. Handy.

Reply Parent Score: 2