Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Aug 2006 22:50 UTC
SuSE, openSUSE "Finally. For years, the holy grail of the Linux desktop has been to get a major computer vendor to commit to preloading a Linux desktop. It finally happened. On August 4th, we found out that Lenovo Group, the company that has taken over IBM's Personal Computing Division, had made a deal with Novell to preload SLED 10 on its ThinkPad T60p mobile workstation. For the first time, a major OEM has committed to preloading a Linux desktop."
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abraxas
Member since:
2005-07-07

Novell just said they wont include propietary drivers on their distribution. So if companies are going to write drivers to support Lenovo-SLED laptops they better make them open source or they'll be wasting time.

Uhhh...No. Please read the articles before you post inane comments like this. Proprietary drivers will still be available for Suse and you can install them with Yast. It doesn't matter much anyway because the ATI drivers for Linux suck, so I don't think you would be losing much if you used the open source driver instead.

As an aside I find it surprising that just a couple of months ago Lenovo announced that they wouldn't be supporting Linux and now they are preloading it. I wouldn't doubt that this has something to do with IBM, and their need for Linux on the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 5

DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"Uhhh...No. Please read the articles before you post inane comments like this. Proprietary drivers will still be available for Suse and you can install them with Yast. "

True statement. Novell will not ship with proprietary drivers, and Lenovo will not be able to ship the laptop with those drivers pre-installed due to the same reasons Novell will not ship them, as that will classify as distributing proprietary drivers pre-linked to the Linux kernel. This will be interesting to see how they do it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

smitty Member since:
2005-10-13

It seems like it would be easy enough to have a first time run program that asks if you want to install the drivers. If you click yes, it could run a script and install them silently in the background.

The other option would be to set up their own repository, which could hold all kinds of extras and addons that they recommend users install.

Edited 2006-08-04 23:47

Reply Parent Score: 2

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Uhhh...No. Please read the articles before you post inane comments like this. Proprietary drivers will still be available for Suse and you can install them with Yast.

That's not including them, is it? They're going to have to work out some way of getting the end user to initiate a download of the drivers themself somewhere in the set up process, and hope that the user has a working and reasonable internet connection.

Reply Parent Score: 3

abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

That's not including them, is it? They're going to have to work out some way of getting the end user to initiate a download of the drivers themself somewhere in the set up process, and hope that the user has a working and reasonable internet connection.

So what if they don't include them. It's not a waste of time to make proprietary drivers because they will still be usable. I'm sure Lenovo will have working drivers for their ethernet/wireless (after all the T series are Intel based) and they will probably include the driver on a CD when the ship the laptops anyway. What is so difficult about that?

if companies are going to write drivers to support Lenovo-SLED laptops they better make them open source or they'll be wasting time.

How is this statement true? They won't be wasting their time because, just like almost every other distribution, you can still install proprietary drivers. It's not like it will be impossible to use proprietary drivers. In fact it will still be quite easy.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Ultimatebadass Member since:
2006-01-08

"It doesn't matter much anyway because the ATI drivers for Linux suck, so I don't think you would be losing much if you used the open source driver instead."

Are you serious? While one can argue if ATI drivers for linux suck or not (and to what degree), saying that one would not be loosing much by using opensource driver is a -little- over the top.

It's fine for 2d, of course, but forget using anything remotely related to 3d. That is, at least, my experience with opensource radeon driver.

Actually, i've been quite happy with ati drivers. Of course they could be better, and I realize that there's a long way to go until they're on par with Windows drivers but on my hardware (9800pro) all 3d software that i'm using works. Without any stability or display corruption issues.

Reply Parent Score: 2