Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 25th Oct 2006 08:41 UTC
Linux A few months ago we ran a poll about the most important non-free Linux apps. We had over 8,000 votes in that poll and we consider the results pretty interesting. Interesting enough to push Linux's market share if a distro capitalized on them?
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Getting more pathetic everyday
by Aussie_Bear on Wed 25th Oct 2006 06:25 UTC
Aussie_Bear
Member since:
2006-01-12

Seriously, this website should just stop breathing...It used to be good, but now its pointless whingeing from the complete lack of understanding of what's going on.


Firstly, the people that demand all this from Linux distros are former Windows users. They aren't familiar with the legal and other ramifications that arise from blindly adopting formats and drivers without thinking. In fact, they don't give a flying f--k, because that's what they've been molded to think.

And that's wrong. Without the existance of such thinking and framework, Linux and other open-source projects wouldn't exist as they are today. Sadly, many people don't realise that. All they care about is the possibility of getting away from Windows. (Which often results in failure, because they're still trying to use their Windows "experience" in Linux).

Second, the Nvidia and ATI driver issue is getting addressed.

Two projects are working on open versions (3D Acceleration) of drivers. So in the future, newbies wouldn't even need to mess with video card drivers for the two most popular video card brands.

For Nvidia cards, the "nouveau project" is handling the open driver.
http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/
If you can help in any way, please do. It benefits to us all.

The R300_DRI handles the ATI side
http://dri.freedesktop.org/wiki/ATIRadeon#head-2f5098616350345fc8b9...

The progress can be found here.
http://megahurts.dk/rune/r300_status.html

Never the less, writing drivers from scratch (with no support from ATI or Nvidia, thank you very much a$$holes), is damn hard work. This will take time, but the goal will be achieved.

As the recent Nvidia driver security issue has emphasized, closed drivers aren't always a good idea, despite that's our only current option. (It demonstrates Theo de Raadt's views.)


And someone mention something about DirectX...Have they not heard of SDL?



All I'm saying is that we should be patient. Whingeing how you want all this doesn't help. In fact, it doesn't do much.

Talking to the developers directly responsible for addressing these deficiencies and helping out in your spare time, does. You help attack the problem directly.

Open-source is about actively addressing issues. Sure, they will take time, but that doesn't mean it won't get done. But what can you expect from volunteers?

Reply Score: 5

AndyJ Member since:
2005-06-30

"Firstly, the people that demand all this from Linux distros are former Windows users. They aren't familiar with the legal and other ramifications that arise from blindly adopting formats and drivers without thinking. In fact, they don't give a flying f--k, because that's what they've been molded to think."

And why should they? These products have been offered to them by the manufacturers, who have been delighted to corner the market and become the de facto standard.

Either the Linux community(ies) want to compete with Windows and Mac for these users or they want to be political about their use of computers. If you go into a shop and buy a DVD, should you expect to see warnings that you are selling-out? Or should you be entitled to think, that's nice I can play this on my TV with a DVD player or I can use that DVD-RW in my home computer to play it on my computer? When you buy an MP3 player and install music, is it unreasonable to want to transfer that music to your PC?

Most PC users don't even understand what the Free in FOSS means, isn't it time to stop looking down on them for that, and time to start find ways to help them find choices? Or shall we all feel superior that we use Linux and understand what FOSS means, and leave the others to Microsoft and Apple? Hmmm doesn't sound like much of a plan to me!

Reply Parent Score: 1

hal2k1 Member since:
2005-11-11

//Either the Linux community(ies) want to compete with Windows and Mac for these users or they want to be political about their use of computers. If you go into a shop and buy a DVD, should you expect to see warnings that you are selling-out? Or should you be entitled to think, that's nice I can play this on my TV with a DVD player or I can use that DVD-RW in my home computer to play it on my computer? When you buy an MP3 player and install music, is it unreasonable to want to transfer that music to your PC? //

These are reasonable questions, but they both very much ignore the fact that for BOTH use case scenarios here (playing the store-bought DVD or transfering the MP3 music to & from the PC) ... both are much easier to achieve on Linux.

Yes! Strange but true! If an end user had to install Windows, then later do either of those things, it is far, far more difficult to do than for that same user to install Linux on that same PC and then do either of those things.

Compare apples with apples, and Linux is the easier. By far.

//and time to start find ways to help them find choices?//

What could be easier to use the Linux start menu, find the system menu, then find the "Add/remove software" menu entry. Start that, and search for "dvd" or "mp3". A few more clicks, and it is all done.

On Windows, it is far harder to install support for playing a DVD or an mp3. Many times harder. And more expensive.

Reply Parent Score: 1

korpenkraxar Member since:
2005-09-10

Either the Linux community(ies) want to compete with Windows and Mac for these users or they want to be political about their use of computers.

You still don't get it do you? There is no grand unified fantastic Linux/FOSS community agenda to outcompete other OSes. There are no FOSS leaders, and no FOSS domination plan. All we have is a shared codebase and the notion that we want to continue sharing it as it evolves. Some developers want to create a nice desktop solution, others a firewall and still others a scientific cluster. Kudos to them all! Some projects like Debian maintain such complex collections of code that you can have either and still benefit from updates and improvements common to the whole project.

When it comes to FOSS, it is the developers' way or the highway. There is no mutual contract. If you don't like what you get, improve it, fork it or go somewhere else.

What I do not get on the other hand is why so many want to switch from Windows to Linux and not experience the most important differences.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Morin Member since:
2005-12-31

> Firstly, the people that demand all this from Linux
> distros are former Windows users. They aren't familiar
> with the legal and other ramifications that arise from
> blindly adopting formats and drivers without thinking.
> In fact, they don't give a flying f--k, because that's
> what they've been molded to think.

This is a highly arrogant and uninformed statement. Firstly, saying that "users have been molded to think" this way shows that you outright ignore the reasons for the decisions. Secondly, most people choose against Linux on a purely economical basis: The compare the money they spend and the time they invest against the resulting features, ease of use, coolness factor, and similar of their computer.

At the bottom line, Linux fails: Not in a single area or even in the same area for different users, but in the sum of all contributions to their decision. For other users, Linux wins at the bottom line, and they change happily and never return to Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 1