Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 13th Nov 2006 08:46 UTC, submitted by someone
Java The cat is out of the bag: Java will be released under the GPL. Joshua Marinacci writes: "I think it makes a lot of sense because it protects Sun's interest in preventing forks and also the community's interest in knowing that Java will forever be available in the public sphere. The GPL has always provided an option to fork just in case someone takes the code in a bad direction. Historically having this option available ensures that it never needs to actually be used, letting the community grow and thrive."
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RE[3]: Good for the World
by santana on Mon 13th Nov 2006 20:50 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Good for the World"
santana
Member since:
2006-10-22

"I don't think so, I think the license change its a clear showcase of Java losing to .NET "

Once, long time ago, when Vista was announced, and was told to be just around the corner, and feature packed like there's no tomorrow, and .Net's grass was greener (faster, smaller, simpler), and I was working on a small projects, I had a kind of feeling too that .Net is going to storm the world.

Then I started to work on a big, and I mean really big government and bank projects. Java won't go away, ever ;) It is actually unfair to call it "new Cobol", guys from MS camp are simply unaware to whom and for what sums are IBM, Oracle and Sun selling Java to. Those projects aren't just going to go away, or getting switched to something else, probably not in our lifetime.

Oh yes, and Vista was kind of late, with kind of dissapointing feature set, and .Net grass is not so green after all, so, glad I've sticked with Java.

Even more glad now when Sun made it even more appealing .

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Good for the World
by Mitarai on Mon 13th Nov 2006 20:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Good for the World"
Mitarai Member since:
2005-07-28

You don't lose a market with customers dropping your product, you lose a market losing potential customers, and .NET have stealed those from Java, but I don't wanna turn this into a Java vs .NET war, only time will tell maybe in a year we'll see the results of this and see how much helped or affected.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Good for the World
by someone on Mon 13th Nov 2006 21:12 in reply to "RE[4]: Good for the World"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

You don't lose a market with customers dropping your product, you lose a market losing potential customers, and .NET have stealed those from Java, but I don't wanna turn this into a Java vs .NET war, only time will tell maybe in a year we'll see the results of this and see how much helped or affected.

Putting Java under the GPL will make Java (Java SE and probably Glassfish) part of the standard linux software stack, much like Apache, MySQL and PHP. Deployment will be much less of an issue with Java being a standard component of linux distros. Many small/medium businesses will be attracted to this combination due to its low cost and wide variety of choices in case they need them.

Edited 2006-11-13 21:26

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Good for the World
by santana on Mon 13th Nov 2006 21:12 in reply to "RE[4]: Good for the World"
santana Member since:
2006-10-22

Interesting definition of loosing a market ;) However, I couldn't care less on who is winning and who is not, as long as there is something for me to do. And with Java it seems it will be a long long time and many many more projects for me to work on. And with opensource strategy my country now has, this java GPL comes quite handy, I must say.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Good for the World
by JeffS on Mon 13th Nov 2006 21:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Good for the World"
JeffS Member since:
2005-07-12

"You don't lose a market with customers dropping your product, you lose a market losing potential customers, and .NET have stealed those from Java, "

Not really, because it's largely impossible. The vast majority of Java installs are in mixed platform environments (thus one of the reasons the organization went with Java in the first place). .Net is not a choice in these environments.

Maybe, just maybe, someone in an all Windows environment was using Java, then went with .Net. But that is just as unlikely because all MS shops tend to stick with MS technologies, because what the in house staff knows.

So in most cases, the organization is all MS, or it's mixed platform. The all MS shops tend to go .Net (with a sprinkling of Java or PHP or other cross platform tech). And the mixed platform environments use cross platform tech only, usually Java.

Thus, Java has most certainly not lost any ground whatsoever to .Net, MS hype be damned.

Reply Parent Score: 1