Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Nov 2006 18:54 UTC, submitted by Jimmy M
.NET (dotGNU too) "Microsoft is pushing Visual Basic 2005 Express as the best language for hobbyists and novices, and are offering it free of charge from the Microsoft Visual Basic Express website. Since the price is right, and I fall into the hobbyist category, I decided to give it a try. This review is intended for amateur programmers, students and hobbyists who are interested in programming their computers."
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RE[2]: .NET?
by sbenitezb on Mon 20th Nov 2006 21:17 UTC in reply to "RE: .NET?"
sbenitezb
Member since:
2005-07-22

I can't think of any respectable school that teaches Logo. Schools should teach studends things that are usefull. Teaching python (without object orientation) is a better aproach. Consider teaching students how to perform arithmetic operations, some logic and how to print and input to/from the console and you gave them the power to build usefull programs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: .NET?
by andrewg on Mon 20th Nov 2006 21:36 in reply to "RE[2]: .NET?"
andrewg Member since:
2005-07-06

I would probably recommend python to. I just used Logo to create the greatest contrast I could think of. Logo was the most basic 'programming' language I could think of and Perl was the most cryptic language in the same class as Ruby I could think of.

We used logo for a month or two in 1989 in the eigth grade on some old Apple computers. It was one of those 'extra' classes everyone had to take for an hour a week but that we weren't graded. People who actually took computer science were taught using Pascal.

Edited 2006-11-20 21:40

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: .NET?
by jptros on Mon 20th Nov 2006 22:14 in reply to "RE[2]: .NET?"
jptros Member since:
2005-08-26

That's a very good but funny notion, schools teaching you something that's actually gonna get you a head start in the real world... hahaha. Man, the day college becomes something more than a false symbol of a person's credibility and value and actually makes you a better candidate for employment will be one special day my friend.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: .NET?
by mmebane on Mon 20th Nov 2006 22:33 in reply to "RE[3]: .NET?"
mmebane Member since:
2005-07-06

So instead of, you know, trying to teach people to think, they should just be trade schools?

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: .NET?
by stestagg on Mon 20th Nov 2006 23:26 in reply to "RE[3]: .NET?"
stestagg Member since:
2006-06-03

My deputy-head actually told me during a formal meeting that the School was 'afraid' of teaching the students about computers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: .NET?
by phoenix on Tue 21st Nov 2006 02:48 in reply to "RE[3]: .NET?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Man, the day college becomes something more than a false symbol of a person's credibility and value and actually makes you a better candidate for employment will be one special day my friend.

No! This is exactly what is wrong with the public school system today. Everything is about "preparing the student for the workforce" now, when it should be about "teaching a student how to think, how to trouble-shoot/problem solve, how to be creative" and so on.

The problem with school is that there is too much emphasis on "marketability" and "employability".

If you want to "learn" to be a workplace drone, then go to a tech institute or trade school. Let's keep education and learning in the public schools and universities.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: .NET?
by marcusgreen on Tue 21st Nov 2006 12:41 in reply to "RE[3]: .NET?"
marcusgreen Member since:
2006-08-21

You seem to be confusing education with training.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: .NET?
by MORB on Tue 21st Nov 2006 12:16 in reply to "RE[2]: .NET?"
MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

Primary schools (think age range 6-10) in France used to teach some rudiments of logo to children. that's how I discovered programming.

This is something where you want a really simple toy language, not something actually useful.

Reply Parent Score: 1