Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Dec 2006 21:24 UTC
Mac OS X OS X is more appealing to enterprises as a desktop operating system than ever before and although it is unlikely to take market share away from Windows, the Mac could reduce the number of Linux-based desktops, according to research group Gartner. In a report published by Gartner this week titled Enterprise Mac Clients Remain Limited, but Apple's Appeal is Growing, analysts Michael Silver, Neil MacDonald, Ray Wagner and Brian Prentice, said that administrators will most likely have to prepare for more Mac systems in their environment even though OS X is "not a suitable enterprise wide platform". Ars weighs in on the issue as well.
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It depends ...
by Nedi on Sat 9th Dec 2006 00:15 UTC
Nedi
Member since:
2006-02-09

... on what you value.

I switched back to Linux from Mac for 2 reasons

1. I noticed that if I wanted to do anything more on the Mac than write a letter or so, suddenly the famous user-friendliness was gone out of the window, and I found myself mucking about in the depths of the Mac system, trying to make things work - reminded me of the years I spent with a certain OS from Redmond ... no big difference. And if I have to muck around, then I prefer do it with an open system - which leads to point two:

2. don't want to get locked in again into a proprietary system.

And the Mac is not that great, either, neither soft- nor hardware-wise, so no big regrets. I'll keep my 2 Macs for the time being, though - maybe some use can be found for them.

Reply Score: 5

RE: It depends ...
by nobody on Sat 9th Dec 2006 01:55 in reply to "It depends ..."
nobody Member since:
2006-06-02

1. Exactly how did "the famous user-friendliness" go "out the window"? What exactly went wrong between opening the Applications folder, double-clicking your word processor of choice, and typing your letter? Do elaborate.

2. As a former avid GNU/Linux user (Slackware for what its worth) since returned to the Windows platform (and in addition, MacOS), I've decided that OSX offers me all the Unix I could want or care for. It offers me development tools, good audio/visual support, a good user experience, perfect driver support, and most importantly, it gets the job done with a minimum amount of p*ssf*arting around. In the end of the day, I just want to get work done, perhaps enjoy a bit of music and watch a film, and then step away from the computer for the rest.

Windows fills in for everything else when I have a need to do .NET development or run Windows only software.

With all of the above covered, I have no compelling reason to devote my precious disk-space or free time to setting up and installing GNU/Linux. Yes it's Free. Yes its cool... but so what?

This is why I can also see GNU/Linux losing out in the Desktop/Workstation-front. It offers no competitive advantage over MacOS or Windows that businesses or end-users will really care about.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: It depends ...
by Anonymous Penguin on Sat 9th Dec 2006 02:35 in reply to "It depends ..."
Anonymous Penguin Member since:
2005-07-06

"1. I noticed that if I wanted to do anything more on the Mac than write a letter or so, suddenly the famous user-friendliness was gone out of the window, and I found myself mucking about in the depths of the Mac system, trying to make things work "

That is very true. I am lucky enough to have years of experience with almost every OS out there except OS X.
And yet when I started using OS X, a few months ago, I found myself googling a lot in order to make things work.
Quite often extra apps are needed in order to get some basic functionality that you took for granted in Linux or Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: It depends ...
by re_re on Sat 9th Dec 2006 06:43 in reply to "RE: It depends ..."
re_re Member since:
2005-07-06

i have to agree to a certain extent, i think osx is a very nice os, but definitly lacking in some areas. Now that i am used to it, it is not so bad, but it took a few months to really get used to it. I am coming from the linux/bsd world and i find myself in the terminal all the time on osx simply because it is the only way to make osx do what i want it do do (unless i pay a bunch of money for a crippled app). I hope all that changes, but quite simply, osx is not made for the power user, if you are a geek you are ok and if you are very unexperienced you are ok
but if you are somewhere in the middle, you will have problems.

Reply Parent Score: 5