Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Jan 2007 23:34 UTC
Windows As part of his keynote address on Sunday at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, Gates showed off Windows Home Server (more info at Ars) - a consumer device to serve as a central storage place for digital photos, music and other media. The first products are due out later this year from HP and others. The goal is to get devices that can cost less than USD 500. In the first of a two-part interview, Microsoft's chairman talks about why the average person wants a server, why they won't need a degree in computer science to run it and what hurdles remain before consumers reach the true digital home.
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RE[2]: Market?
by mallard on Tue 9th Jan 2007 00:32 UTC in reply to "RE: Market?"
mallard
Member since:
2006-01-06

It's not the server itself I don't see the need for, its a special version of Windows for it.

An older (P-III) PC can be bought for ~$50 from eBay, a 400GB HDD for ~$100. Therefore you could easily set up a home server for ~$150.
Such a PC would likely be already licenced for Windows (even Win98 would work well enough) and a suitible Linux distro can be obtained for free.

I contend that the average person has no need or desire for a server, so those who want one will almost certianly have the expertise to set one up.

Why do we need a special version of Windows?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Market?
by n4cer on Tue 9th Jan 2007 00:55 in reply to "RE[2]: Market?"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

It's not the server itself I don't see the need for, its a special version of Windows for it.
An older (P-III) PC can be bought for ~$50 from eBay, a 400GB HDD for ~$100. Therefore you could easily set up a home server for ~$150.
Such a PC would likely be already licenced for Windows (even Win98 would work well enough) and a suitible Linux distro can be obtained for free.


It depends ou what you think "easy" means. The goal for WHS is to allow people to get the benefits of a home server without having to be an admin. If you know how to cobble together a server and don't mind doing so, WHS isn't likely targeted at you.

I contend that the average person has no need or desire for a server, so those who want one will almost certianly have the expertise to set one up.

When the average person loses the data he deems important because he didn't keep regualr backups or know how to setup a RAID array, etc., he'll wish he had, and probably will look for a solution such as WHS.

Why do we need a special version of Windows?

Because it's a purpose-specific product and will be priced according to the functionality offered and the market. It also doesn't need to be in lock-step with general Windows releases.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Market?
by mallard on Tue 9th Jan 2007 01:17 in reply to "RE[3]: Market?"
mallard Member since:
2006-01-06

It depends ou what you think "easy" means.

"Easy" as in "connect the large hard drive as the secondary master or externally via USB, right click on the icon in 'My Computer' and set up sharing.".
Although with Linux it will be "install the OS, install Webmin and set up sharing from there", slightly more complex.

(Note that the box only needs a monitor for this short proccess. VNC or Remote Desktop can be used for maintanance.)

Even if you first have to install the OS it won't take more than an hour or two.

Reply Parent Score: 1