Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 14th Feb 2007 01:04 UTC, submitted by Punktyras
Hardware, Embedded Systems The world's first commercially viable quantum computer was unveiled and demonstrated today in Silicon Valley by D-Wave Systems, Inc., a privately-held Canadian firm headquartered near Vancouver. Quantum computing offers the potential to create value in areas where problems or requirements exceed the capability of digital computing, the company said. But D-Wave explains that its new device is intended as a complement to conventional computers, to augment existing machines and their market, not as a replacement for them.
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RE[5]: hmmm
by jziegler on Wed 14th Feb 2007 09:43 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: hmmm"
jziegler
Member since:
2005-07-14

The stream cannot be "touched" between sender/reciever without the payload being invalidated, that's what I was trying to get at.

Sounds like a pretty easy DoS opportunity. Just touch the stream every time and the intended recipient will never receive it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: hmmm
by ormandj on Wed 14th Feb 2007 09:50 in reply to "RE[5]: hmmm"
ormandj Member since:
2005-10-09

How will you know it's being sent? Good try, though. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: hmmm
by wirespot on Wed 14th Feb 2007 10:38 in reply to "RE[5]: hmmm"
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

That applies to any form of communication. What the data contains is irrelevant if you can interfere with the transmission.

No, the greatest trick is to allow the communication to go on apparently untouched and safe, while actually eavesdropping. That is impossible with quantum technology, because it's not possible (at least for now) to reproduce the same data stream once you've touched it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: hmmm
by dekernel on Wed 14th Feb 2007 17:18 in reply to "RE[5]: hmmm"
dekernel Member since:
2005-07-07

Sounds like a pretty easy DoS opportunity. Just touch the stream every time and the intended recipient will never receive it.

Not true. The message will arrive, but it will be rejected due to the fact that the message was 'altered'.

Reply Parent Score: 1