Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Feb 2007 17:38 UTC, submitted by anonymous
Debian and its clones Last September, some of the Debian Linux distribution's leadership wanted to make sure that Etch, the next version of Debian, arrived on its December 4th due date. Almost two months later, though, according to the February 17th Release Critical Bug Report memo to the Debian Developers Announcement list, there are still 541 release critical bugs.
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Regarding the article
by chris_dk on Fri 23rd Feb 2007 19:55 UTC
chris_dk
Member since:
2005-07-12

The article tries to make it look like Debian has a problem. Of course it has, but so does Ubuntu, Fedora etc.

Other distros just release at a certain date, no matter the quality of the packages. Debian does not.

It matters to have both Debian and distros like Ubuntu for people who care less about the individual package quality and more about usability / ease of use.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Regarding the article
by superman on Sat 24th Feb 2007 09:28 in reply to "Regarding the article"
superman Member since:
2006-08-01

> Other distros just release at a certain date, no matter the quality of the packages. Debian does not.

Fedora, RHEL, OpenSuSE, Ubuntu, Mandrake, all have delayed a release. One week, two weeks, sometimes 2 months.
Debian simply does not know how to manage a release.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Regarding the article
by da_Chicken on Sat 24th Feb 2007 11:22 in reply to "RE: Regarding the article"
da_Chicken Member since:
2006-01-01

Debian simply does not know how to manage a release.

I think you're overlooking a couple of rather obvious problems in releasing Debian.

One problem Debian must face is that it's one of the biggest distros out there, maybe bigger than any of the other distros you mention. Debian supports 11 architectures and possibly more packages than any other distro.

Another big problem is that Debian developers are volunteers who don't get paid for their Debian work. This means that they cannot concentrate full-time, seven days a week to get the release out on time.

Now, put these two problems together -- you've got this very big distro that needs a lot of complicated and synchronized work to get the release out, but the developers can only work for Debian when they've got some extra time in the evenings.

Sounds like a Mission Impossible? Actually, they've done rather well so far but there are still a couple of issues to be sorted out before they can release Etch. If people could just accept the idea that a good product is more important for Debian developers than releasing at a specific point in time, they might have a little bit more patience.

People like Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols can make fun of Debian, comparing it to Duke Nukem Forever and suggesting that it will never be released, but these snide comments will lose their entertainment value as soon as Etch is out. And if it's a good release (I have no doubt that it is), then that's what people will remember.

Reply Parent Score: 3