Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th Mar 2007 11:02 UTC, submitted by Frank Lopez
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris Ian Murdock says he drew a lot of puzzled looks from his colleagues in the Linux community when he joined Sun Microsystems in its newly created position of chief operating platforms officer. 'What's a Linux guy doing at Sun?' he was asked. After all, Ian Murdock is the 'Ian' in Debian Linux, the distribution he created with his wife, Deb. Only eight days on his new job, Murdock spoke at a Software Developers Forum Tuesday in Santa Clara, California, where Sun is based. Murdock, 33, outlined what he thinks needs to be done in his new job in an interview with Robert Mullins.
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RE[3]: Good luck!
by Luminair on Fri 30th Mar 2007 15:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Good luck!"
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

it takes me less than a minute to accomplish this by editing the /etc/nsswitch.conf and creating a /etc/resolv.conf, that's really hard!

I have no problems navigating Linux, so why does Sun have to change in order to make Linux users happy.

I don't think it is about making Solaris into Linux. And I don't think Sun is trying to change Solaris to make Linux users happy.

You just described a bunch of Unix functions as easy, but I'd have no idea where to start when solving that problem. That means I cannot use Solaris without investing time and energy into learning the ropes and reading the docs. That means Sun will gain a potential customer if they make it easier to use.

So it's not about turning Solaris into Linux, it's about making Solaris a better operating system.

People who don't understand the value of a simple and easy-to-use GUI are like pick-wielding miners who didn't want drilling machines to take their jobs. Join us in the 21st century -- I don't have the time or inclination to pick away at server administration, and I don't have the money to pay two experienced admins when two university grads and a GUI would do.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Good luck!
by Robert Escue on Fri 30th Mar 2007 20:27 in reply to "RE[3]: Good luck!"
Robert Escue Member since:
2005-07-08

And where do you think I got my education on Solaris? By reading tons of documentation, by Beta Testing Sun products, and by being employed as a system administrator on Solaris, Linux, and AIX systems since 1998. It is the nature of the beast that you have to be informed about the products you are working with if you plan to go anywhere in the IT field, or for your own benefit. That education is an ongoing process, and if you don't have the time, then why should the OS vendor make it easy for you?

I have mentioned this before, but what good is a GUI to me over a serial link (where a lot of UNIX/Linux system administration takes place)? Welcome to reality, where a PuTTy session is as good as it gets for the vast majority of system administrators (myself included). A GUI does not make up for lack of experience. AIX is possibly the easiest UNIX variant to learn through the use of smit (X) or smitty (CLI), but you can screw up a system in nothing flat by issuing the wrong command.

You are not the first one to think that an easy to use interface and a general knowledge of IT will get them by. This happens every day on networks throughout the world by people who make decisions based on dollars and not sense. These are the people who end up choosing Microsoft, because it is "easy to use" and look at where it gets them ...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Good luck!
by butters on Sat 31st Mar 2007 08:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Good luck!"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

I don't think it is about making Solaris into Linux. And I don't think Sun is trying to change Solaris to make Linux users happy.

I disagree. I think Sun is trying to make Solaris look and feel just like the very best Linux distributions, and I think that this is a brilliant strategy. Ian alludes to this here:

But what people love about Ubuntu is not the Linux kernel but all of the stuff that lives above it. So, could we take all that stuff above Linux and put it above Solaris in a way that does not leave behind all of all the differentiating features of Solaris?

And here's what I wrote about Ian moving to Sun in last week's thread:

I speculate that what Ian has in mind for Solaris is standardizing on the "Linux" userland (including the GNU toolchain) and implementing the Linux system call interface. Essentially, make everything like a Linux distribution except for the kernel. A Linux-compatible distribution featuring a kernel with enterprise-class stability and functionality, including DTrace, Containers, and ZFS. I would not at all be surprised if Ubuntu winds up involved in some way, shape, or form.

I think Sun has realized that Linux is the de facto standard free software development platform. The easiest way to make inroads in free software is to make a better Linux. The best way for Sun to do this is to scrap the Linux kernel and build it on Solaris instead. It won't be Linux anymore, of course, but it will seem like Linux to Linux-native applications and Linux-oriented developers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Good luck!
by kaiwai on Sat 31st Mar 2007 09:13 in reply to "RE[4]: Good luck!"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think Sun has realized that Linux is the de facto standard free software development platform. The easiest way to make inroads in free software is to make a better Linux. The best way for Sun to do this is to scrap the Linux kernel and build it on Solaris instead. It won't be Linux anymore, of course, but it will seem like Linux to Linux-native applications and Linux-oriented developers.


Incorrect; look through the changes being made; they're adding features to Solaris which exist within GNU userland - libc for example, has has received an update (can't find the link sorry) which provides a feature which is available in the GNU libc.

Solaris doesn't need to drop anything, what Solaris needs is to listen to developers, listen to end users and come out with a happy medium; if it means that new features should be added to their userland to improve GNU compatibility, and thus, make porting and compiling opensource applications to Solaris - instead of requiring re-writes of GNU functionality, then I say its all good.

For me, I don't want it to be yet another Linux clone or want to be; I mean, if people want Linux, they can load on Ubuntu and be done with it. For me, I not only want Solaris to be the best server operating system, but the best operating system over all, regardless of what it is used for.

The problem as I see it, getting developers to start to use Sun compilers - if opensource developers start using Sun compilers, clean up their code, then one can start using some of the awesome optimisations which Sun has in their compilers; and the side effect of the code clean up, it should also mean compiling with the Intel compilers without any problems.

Edit: Just had a look: http://www.opensolaris.org/os/community/arc/caselog/2007/

There is a sizable number of GNU tools that are being merged, hopefully that should make porting alot easier for all concerned.

Edited 2007-03-31 09:21

Reply Parent Score: 2