Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Apr 2007 21:29 UTC
Zeta A lot of things have happened in the past few days concerning Zeta, BeOS, and Haiku. In order to create some order in the chaos, Eugenia and I have created a rough timeline of what happened the past 6-7 years. Read on for the timeline and some more thoughts on the matter. Update: Magnusoft ceases distribution of Zeta. Update II: Access answered the questions posed in the article.
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RE[4]: I'll tell you why...
by lucky13 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 16:49 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: I'll tell you why..."
lucky13
Member since:
2007-04-01

The potential for Haiku is tremendous.

The genuine momentum of Linux is greater than any perceived potential for Haiku. Haiku won't do any better than BeOS on the desktop, and in looking at its roadmap I see no plans for scalability so it can run on anything but x86 desktops and maybe PPC. Where's anything about being able to run on mobile devices? It doesn't even have a fully-operable network stack yet.
http://haiku-os.org/glass_elevator
http://dev.haiku-os.org/roadmap

In addition to cell phones, Linux is targeting (and reaching!) the next wave of PDAs:
http://www.brighthand.com/default.asp?newsID=12928

This isn't flame-bait. Just the facts. Haiku's focus isn't on the future (mobile), it's on the past (desktop). That's not what I call potential.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: I'll tell you why...
by atezun on Thu 5th Apr 2007 16:58 in reply to "RE[4]: I'll tell you why..."
atezun Member since:
2005-07-06

In addition to cell phones, Linux is targeting (and reaching!) the next wave of PDAs:
http://www.brighthand.com/default.asp?newsID=12928


Did you happen to notice big editor's note at the top of that article?

"Editor's Note: This article is an April Fools Day joke. It is entirely fictitious."

Edited 2007-04-05 16:59

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: I'll tell you why...
by rabyte on Thu 5th Apr 2007 16:59 in reply to "RE[5]: I'll tell you why..."
rabyte Member since:
2005-06-29
RE[6]: I'll tell you why...
by lucky13 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:02 in reply to "RE[5]: I'll tell you why..."
lucky13 Member since:
2007-04-01

That editor's note was NOT on it when I first read it (early morning of 1 April). At least I caught on to the one about Ballmer joining the Linux Foundation.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: I'll tell you why...
by tonestone57 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:00 in reply to "RE[4]: I'll tell you why..."
tonestone57 Member since:
2005-12-31

I just don't get you Linux advocaters coming on here & bashing Haiku.

All I hear is "Haiku won't make it. Forget Haiku & BeOS; They're not worth it.", etc.

Well. When Linux started out, 1) how many users did it have? 2) In the first 5 years, what did the number of pc users grow to? 3) What platforms did it support? 4) How good was it overall?

It has taken Linux many, many years before gaining lots of users and popularity. Haiku will do the same over time, though today, it has to compete with Linux. What are you afraid of, that Linux will lose the battle? You like Linux so much, then stick with it and let the rest of us enjoy BeOS/Haiku.

I think Haiku will make it, but won't happen in 2 years, but take something like 5 years to start being noticed *and* Linux / Windows will lose users to Haiku.

This isn't flame-bait. Just the facts.
I didn't realize you had a crystal ball and could see 10 years in the future & know what Haiku will or won't have. Linux didn't offer much in the start either, it took a couple of years *after* the first release to get things going.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: I'll tell you why...
by lucky13 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:16 in reply to "RE[5]: I'll tell you why..."
lucky13 Member since:
2007-04-01

When Linux started out

BeOS isn't just starting out. Neither is Haiku.

Haiku will do the same

No, it won't. It will appeal to the same people BeOS appealed to.

won't happen in 2 years, but take something like 5 years to start being noticed

Meaning 2012, at which time people will be using Linux on cell phones and mobile devices without knowing a single thing about command lines or bash scripts.

Linux / Windows will lose users to Haiku

And pigs will fly and monkeys will fly out of all our...

Linux didn't offer much in the start either, it took a couple of years

We're not a "couple years" into the lifespan of BeOS and its open source offspring, we're a couple years past its relevance. There are very major differences in how each platform has developed. Linux was suited not only to immediate relevance (80836), but relevance that would extend beyond (Pentium) and into the future (scalability for use in mobile devices). Haiku has no such strategy. It's trying to recreate Be with an open source license. I don't have anything bad to say about that (read what I wrote on my blog -- I admire what they're doing). I just think it's creating its own obsolescence by tying itself to the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: I'll tell you why...
by Vibe on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:17 in reply to "RE[5]: I'll tell you why..."
Vibe Member since:
2007-03-12

It has taken Linux many, many years before gaining lots of users and popularity. Haiku will do the same over time, though today, it has to compete with Linux. What are you afraid of, that Linux will lose the battle? You like Linux so much, then stick with it and let the rest of us enjoy BeOS/Haiku.

Haiku has a core philosophy and responsible team of people managing it. That's a good sign. One big hurdle for Linux is that it's a mess. OS X is exclusive. Windows is a walled garden. Haiku doesn't suffer from those impediments.

Right out of the box Haiku has a good design and documentation. Anyone who has Haiku will have the same experience on another machine. It's not drowned in bloatware, and porting key applications is no real bother. How can it not do well?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: I'll tell you why...
by Vibe on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:00 in reply to "RE[4]: I'll tell you why..."
Vibe Member since:
2007-03-12

The genuine momentum of Linux is greater than any perceived potential for Haiku. Haiku won't do any better than BeOS on the desktop, and in looking at its roadmap I see no plans for scalability so it can run on anything but x86 desktops and maybe PPC. Where's anything about being able to run on mobile devices? It doesn't even have a fully-operable network stack yet.

Well, that's an opinion. There are others. I prefer mine.

Reply Parent Score: 2