Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 29th Apr 2007 21:58 UTC, submitted by andrewg
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y George Ou compares Microsoft Office 2007 to OpenOffice 2.2 in memory and CPU usage using the OOXML and ODF file formats. The conclusion according to Ou: "We can see that the OpenOffice.org ODF XML parser (while vastly improved) is still about 5 times slower than Microsoft's OOXML parser. OpenOffice.org also seems to consume nearly 4 times the amount of RAM to hold the same data. While OpenOffice.org continues to have fewer features than Microsoft Office, it continues to consume far more resources than Microsoft."
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RE[2]: Reliability
by ma_d on Sun 29th Apr 2007 23:12 UTC in reply to "RE: Reliability"
ma_d
Member since:
2005-06-29

Little blue things popping up to recommend things you've seen and told it no on dozens of times before.

Automatic changes where the undo command is the reasonable way to interact with the program (it does two actions for the price of one, so you hit undo to get rid of the one you didn't want).

Expanding menus.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Reliability
by flanque on Sun 29th Apr 2007 23:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Reliability"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

All of these are options you can change.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Reliability
by ma_d on Mon 30th Apr 2007 00:34 in reply to "RE[3]: Reliability"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

If I wanted to dig through the expanding menus, sure I could probably eventually figure it out.

I'll prefer the program that's free, does what I need, and defaults to a behavior I can live with.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Reliability
by atsureki on Mon 30th Apr 2007 04:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Reliability"
atsureki Member since:
2006-03-12

All of these are options you can change.


Numerous and poorly sorted options is no relief from bad design. If you decide to make the settings work for you rather than learning to work with the settings (like the compulsive "undo random automatic change" habit mentioned elsewhere), as soon as you sit down to use Word at work or school or someone else's system, you won't even know what you're looking at. The sheer number of bizarre split-hair settings available is probably the biggest reason I dread fixing people's Microsoft systems -- problems become almost indistinguishable from preferences.

Reply Parent Score: 4