Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 23rd May 2007 23:50 UTC, submitted by irbis
Oracle and SUN After just over a year as chief executive, Jonathan Schwartz is moving into a new phase as the leader of Sun Microsystems. Much of his opening months was spent emerging from the shadow of the highly visible Scott McNealy, boosted by Schwartz's high-profile blog. Now that the introductory period is over, Schwartz is working to show that the Silicon Valley stalwart can regain its former stature.
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RE[4]: Challenges
by Luminair on Thu 24th May 2007 20:43 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Challenges"
Luminair
Member since:
2007-03-30

His point is that people can't easily contribute to OpenSolaris, which is true. To submit code you have to run it by a Sun staff member first, and there is a whole process to doing that. Sun knows this isn't typical for OSS (and I assume they know it sucks), and they're said to be working on it.

I can imagine how hard it would be for a closed software house to open their work up to joe on the street.

But whatever you do, don't think that OpenSolaris has few community patches because it is less buggy. It has plenty of bugs and even more room for improvement. 69 fixes were delivered already today, for instance: http://bugs.opensolaris.org/search.do?process=1&category=&subcatego...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Challenges
by kaiwai on Fri 25th May 2007 03:22 in reply to "RE[4]: Challenges"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

His point is that people can't easily contribute to OpenSolaris, which is true. To submit code you have to run it by a Sun staff member first, and there is a whole process to doing that. Sun knows this isn't typical for OSS (and I assume they know it sucks), and they're said to be working on it.


Yes, but at the same time, look at their arc process; rather than simply merging in code, and working out the issues later; its actually tested; making sure that the code is up to the coding standards set by the OpenSolaris community. If it means that some impatient submitters don't come on board, then so be it, its a small price to pay to maintain code quality.

Oh, and in reply to the, quite frankly, bullcrap spread by Butters, Sun *DOES NOT CONTROL* OpenSolaris - they are but a couple of players on the OpenSolaris board; OpenSolaris is now overwhelmingly controlled by the community *NOT* Sun.

This is more anti-Sun rhetoric from IBM and IBM employees; they've now got nothing to whine about now; Java is being opensourced, Solaris is being opensourced and ported to PowerPC and x86 support is improving.

IBM would like you to think that Sun is dying, that SPARC is dying, that Sun isn't committed to Solaris or x86. As rapper said "don't believe the hype" - this is the case with IBM. Don't believe the hype, look at the facts.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Challenges
by drdoug on Fri 25th May 2007 13:13 in reply to "RE[4]: Challenges"
drdoug Member since:
2006-04-30

> His point is that people can't easily contribute to OpenSolaris, which is true. To submit code you have to run it by a Sun staff member first, and there is a whole process to doing that.

This is not correct. As somebody who has direct commit access to certain OpenSolaris projects and not employed by Sun, I can that the rules of contribution is project dependent.

Reply Parent Score: 2