Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Jun 2007 15:23 UTC
Mac OS X As you have surely noticed by now, Apple's CEO Steve Jobs held his keynote speech yesterday at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco. So far, the responses have been mixed; I have seen a lot of excitement, but also a lot of disappointment. Personally, I am not really sure where I stand.
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RE[2]: Gaming is it
by fretinator on Tue 12th Jun 2007 18:43 UTC in reply to "RE: Gaming is it"
fretinator
Member since:
2005-07-06

Closed-source games could do very well on Linux, because it isn't only Free Software zealots who happen to use Linux, and most of those people would welcome decent games for Linux wholeheartedly.


The problem is that Closed-source games go against the very foundation on which the OS resides - Free Software. This will never go away unless Linux goes away. Mac was able to absorb some of the BSD "love" because of the BSD license. You cannot do that with GPL code. Thus, binary-only drivers and binary-only software will always be second class - an evil that is [sometimes] endured until Free replacements are available.

My dream is for there to someday be a way to create a multi-million-dollar game and release it as Free Software, and still make money - and not because you charge for "services" or "servers". I believe the reimbursement element needs to be built into the system, but I don't see how.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Gaming is it
by Slapo on Tue 12th Jun 2007 19:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Gaming is it"
Slapo Member since:
2005-07-06

You've said it yourself:
"Open-source games couldn't generate the money (in my opinion) to pay for the amount of developers, artists, musicians needed to make modern games."
There's no arguing about that, a multi-million-dollar game released as Free Software and making money probably won't happen ;)

The thing with proprietary binaries is that they usually do what people need them to do, without waiting for someone to write an open clone, which will take a long time to get near the original in many aspects.
So while it may go against the Free Software as a foundation for Linux license wise (or is it?), they'll probably have to switch to a license that allows it without just being tolerated, but accepted.
I couldn't care less if e.g. Fifa 2004, of which I own an original CD, would run on Linux and be just a bunch of binaries if it ran. Frankly, most people don't use open source apps because they are open source, but because they get them for free (and pre-compiled).
Besides, Free Software doesn't necessarily have to be in conflict with non-free software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Gaming is it
by elsewhere on Tue 12th Jun 2007 21:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Gaming is it"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

The problem is that Closed-source games go against the very foundation on which the OS resides - Free Software. This will never go away unless Linux goes away. Mac was able to absorb some of the BSD "love" because of the BSD license. You cannot do that with GPL code. Thus, binary-only drivers and binary-only software will always be second class - an evil that is [sometimes] endured until Free replacements are available.


Free software philosophy has nothing to do with it, there are companies making millions upon millions selling closed software that runs on linux. Problem is with the market; the companies making money selling linux software are generally targeting the datacenter, where linux is a proven commodity and market.

Gaming though, implies home/consumer use, and that's a much more difficult market to measure in terms of viability, particularly considering the vast majority of gamers using linux already have Windows for gaming anyways. Linux needs market viability with numbers to back it up in order to encourage developers to target it as a platform, until then it's a case of falling back to Windows or using wine-esque workarounds.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Gaming is it
by Fergy on Wed 13th Jun 2007 06:04 in reply to "RE[2]: Gaming is it"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

My dream is for there to someday be a way to create a multi-million-dollar game and release it as Free Software, and still make money - and not because you charge for "services" or "servers". I believe the reimbursement element needs to be built into the system, but I don't see how.

You could make a deal like the gpl does where everybody wins. You keep the game closed source for an amount of time(to make money) where people both pay for the game but also for the fact that it will be opensourced after 2 to 3 years.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Gaming is it
by fretinator on Wed 13th Jun 2007 14:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Gaming is it"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

Like WineX/Cedega?

p.s., I know they contribute code back, just like Codeweavers does. But in general, I haven't seen the "HostageWare" concept play out well.

Reply Parent Score: 2