Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Jun 2007 19:36 UTC, submitted by atezun
Games Despite what many (including myself) thought when EA announced they would support the Mac platform, the games EA will release are actually not native ports - instead, they will use Transgaming's Cider engine, a Wine-like wrapper for running Windows games on Intel Macs. This news was found in a Transgaming press release. Apart from the fact that this might negatively affect performance, it also means PowerPC Macs will not be able to play these games.
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gaming on other os
by Zedicus on Tue 12th Jun 2007 20:48 UTC
Zedicus
Member since:
2005-12-05

now osx faces the same battle gaming on linux does. the whole 'they wont make games tillthere are users, there wont be users till there are games' thing. on the bright side if a company was going to bash out a port for OSX native then it wouldnt take much to bash out a native linux port too. and with these 2 major (major as in largest of the minor) platforms both using OpenGL then maybe more effort will go into it as a gaming tool again. if the ball roles the right way this could all be a good thing, in 5-10 yrs.

Reply Score: 4

RE: gaming on other os
by Almafeta on Wed 13th Jun 2007 00:56 in reply to "gaming on other os"
Almafeta Member since:
2007-02-22

Now, here's the curious thing: Why doesn't Apple make games?

Microsoft doesn't make many games, but the few big-ticket games they have released -- Halo, Mechwarrior, Age of Empires -- have been games that have really showcased the possibilities of PC game development.

Microsoft does few of them in-house, but that could be Apple's solution as well. If Apple has the money to create dozens and dozens of new iProducts with accompanying advertisement lines, why not entice developers and gamers to the platform by commissioning a few top-notch games (one each in a few broad genres would do it) to show off the power of the Mac as a gaming platform? Heck, you could make an XBox Live-lookalike (iPlay?) without any problem.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by mallard on Wed 13th Jun 2007 01:23 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
mallard Member since:
2006-01-06

Interesting that you mention Halo...

Halo was originally announced at MacWorld '99, as the flagship game of Apple's Mac gaming push, from Bungie, a well known Mac games developer. Of course it has changed alot since then, even changing genre.
The only reason it ever got a Mac version was because it had been promised to Mac users for so long.

So last time Apple tried to push Mac gaming, their flagship game ended up the flagship of Microsoft's console. I can't think of a worse result.

Besides, none of the games you mentioned was actually developed by Microsoft. Microsoft only publishes games.

Edited 2007-06-13 01:24

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by SlackerJack on Wed 13th Jun 2007 01:35 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Well Apple is a hardware company, they may do software but not to that level. Microsoft have a separate place for games dev not in-house.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: gaming on other os
by evangs on Wed 13th Jun 2007 07:25 in reply to "gaming on other os"
evangs Member since:
2005-07-07

There is a big difference between Linux and OS X when it comes to games. How many shareware game companies are there on OS X, or companies that specialize in porting PC games to OS X? Off the top of my head, I count 4. Ambrosia, Freeverse, Macplay and Macsoft. How many similar companies exist on Linux? None. Loki was in business for a bit, but they went bust. iD's John Carmack has come out and stated that there is no demand for games on Linux and the cost of the port is not recouped by the sales.

To sum up, on one hand you've got a pretty vibrant shareware and commercial games scene on the Mac. You've got pretty much a dead scene on Linux. The Mac game houses are pretty well established and don't look like they're going anywhere. Nobody is willing to take the plunge into Linux gaming after the Loki debacle.

I'm sorry but I disagree with you. Linux and OS X do not face the same battle. There is no commercial demand for games on Linux while companies are making a living porting games over to the Mac and developing Mac native shareware games.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by thebluesgnr on Wed 13th Jun 2007 10:30 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
thebluesgnr Member since:
2005-11-14

There is a big difference between Linux and OS X when it comes to games.

Yes. The big difference is that the majority of Linux users have always had the ability to dual boot and play games on Windows, which was not true for the Mac platform up until recently. Since Apple switched to x86 it also gained this ability, which naturally gives Mac users a lot more possibilities and makes the life of the companies you mentioned a lot harder.

Nobody is willing to take the plunge into Linux gaming after the Loki debacle.

Of course, you're forgetting the obvious one: Transgaming. You're also forgetting that there's a wealthy collection of Free software games available for GNU/Linux and other free operating systems, some which are quite impressive I might add.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by sard on Wed 13th Jun 2007 11:00 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
sard Member since:
2005-11-16

Let's just hope the 'Live' nonsense doesn't catch on with PC games or we'll be begging for alternatives.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by Zedicus on Wed 13th Jun 2007 13:10 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
Zedicus Member since:
2005-12-05

loki happened a long time ago as far as technology is concerned. with the presure ubuntu is having in getting the linux out its only a matter of time before users start screaming for gaming.

OSX on x86 is step one. and a baby step at that. gaming on that platform will increase. and as linux use increases peeple will want to use it for gaming. the porting houses will take notice.

like i said if the ball rolls the right way this could be the start of a huge movement, in 5-10 yrs.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: gaming on other os
by anda_skoa on Wed 13th Jun 2007 17:30 in reply to "RE: gaming on other os"
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

How many similar companies exist on Linux? None.


RuneSoft, Linux Game Publishing

http://www.rune-soft.com/main.php
http://www.linuxgamepublishing.com/

Reply Parent Score: 2