Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 11th Jul 2005 17:32 UTC
Windows Mike Nash, Microsoft's security business and technology unit corporate vice president, has said Longhorn would accord end-users certain rights and privileges apparently ending the concept that everyone using their PC is also the PC's administrator. Update: More on new Longhorn features here.
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Wow
by orestes on Mon 11th Jul 2005 17:45 UTC
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

Here I was thinking Windows had a privileges system in place since the advent of NT. The problem was always that the users were too lazy/ignorant to use it properly.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Wow
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 11th Jul 2005 17:48 in reply to "Wow"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The news is not that this system will be implemented, but rather that it will be implemeneted *properly* now. Windows has some seriously advanced user management tools already, it's just that no one ever uses or implements them, *including* Microsoft.That will apparently change with Longhorn.

About time.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Wow
by orestes on Mon 11th Jul 2005 17:53 in reply to "RE: Wow"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

But will it be implemented properly? What's to stop Joe User from going back to the same bad habits Microsoft has helped to create over the past 20 years? Will it refuse to take bad passwords or disallow administrator login completely? Will it stop the user from simply disabling it because the logins annoy them?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Wow
by on Mon 11th Jul 2005 18:08 in reply to "Wow"
Member since:

The problem wasn't that users were too lazy/ignorant, but that developers wouldn't (and some still don't) allow users to run their programs in a limited user account.

And part of the reason for this, when you get down to it, was that Microsoft encouraged users to run under administrative accounts.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Wow
by orestes on Mon 11th Jul 2005 18:18 in reply to "RE: Wow"
orestes Member since:
2005-07-06

The problem wasn't that users were too lazy/ignorant, but that developers wouldn't (and some still don't) allow users to run their programs in a limited user account.

A valid point, but I still don't believe the vast majority of Windows users would have bothered to set up and use limited accounts.

Reply Parent Score: 1