Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 12th Aug 2007 15:52 UTC, submitted by zaboing
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "A few months ago, the GNOME Mobile Platform was announced to the public. One of the main forces behind the launch of this initiative was Nokia, which uses a lot of GNOME-components in its Linux-based Internet Tablets Nokia 770 and N800. During this years GUADEC Andreas Proschofsky had the chance to sit down with Carlos Guerreiro, Nokias Manager for Open Source Software, to talk - amidst other things - about the not so different needs of personal computers and mobile devices, about the necessity for GTK+ 3.0 and the impact of the iPhone launch."
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RE[5]: what situation?
by binarycrusader on Mon 13th Aug 2007 22:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: what situation?"
binarycrusader
Member since:
2005-07-06

Basically, this is only a partial abi breakage on 64-bit binaries with data segments that can exceed 4 GB. Anything that is 32-bit only (as is the vast majority of ISV-ware) is unaffected.


The point is, the ABI keeps changing. Even partial breakage is still breakage.

It only adds to the frustration of developers using the platform.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: what situation?
by yokem55 on Tue 14th Aug 2007 04:19 in reply to "RE[5]: what situation?"
yokem55 Member since:
2005-07-06

It only adds to the frustration of developers using the platform.


How can this particular ABI breakage cause frustration for the average ISV dev on the gnu c++ platform? If a developer is only targeting 32-bit x86 (which until 64 bit linux becomes far more widespread, this is going to be the vast majority of ISV's) this particular ABI change will have ZERO impact, and the ABI is exactly the same as it was in gcc 4.0 and 3.4.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: what situation?
by binarycrusader on Tue 14th Aug 2007 13:14 in reply to "RE[6]: what situation?"
binarycrusader Member since:
2005-07-06


How can this particular ABI breakage cause frustration for the average ISV dev on the gnu c++ platform?


See, now you're qualifying it. You're trying to "wiggle out" of the point that there are ABI changes. First your claim was that there were no ABI changes, then your claim was only for a certain platform, and now your claim is that it doesn't affect the average (whatever that is) isv. You keep narrowing the scope of your claims.

Remember, the whole discussion was regarding my point that the ABI keeps changing. I don't care what part of the ABI does change. ABI changes are difficult, annoying, and should have been unnecessary with the proper foresight and planning on the part of the gcc team. Many other platforms have managed to maintain their ABI decades without issue. Only the GNU platform seems to manage to screw it up every year.

Reply Parent Score: 2