Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th Sep 2007 11:48 UTC, submitted by abdavidson
Opera Software Opera has released an alpha build of their upcoming 9.5 release. "Following the release of Opera 9 last year, we re-wrote Opera's rendering engine for the coming Opera 9.5 release. As a result, Opera 9.5 contains more than a year's worth of speed, standards and performance improvements."
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Opera's interface
by terog on Tue 4th Sep 2007 17:16 UTC
terog
Member since:
2007-03-09

My main gripe about Opera is it's interface - it doesn't "blend in" at all on any platform. By this I mean that the widgets, icons and the file dialog look, feel and behave different than the platform's native ones.

Firefox is a bit better in this regard (esp. in widgets), but nowhere near perfect and with version 2 it became worse (e.g. the look of tabs).

Now, please don't tell me about skins. They're not a solution to this problem (or problems). They're actually the source of this problem (at least partly).

I know there are native browsers like Konqueror, Epiphany, Kmeleon and Camino, but these just don't cut it. None of them have anywhere near the features and/or usability you get with Firefox or Opera.

As I'm mainly a KDE user, I have high hopes that Konqueror in KDE4 will be a truly great browser. Unfortunately it will still not have anything comparable to Firefox extensions (AFAIK).

Edited 2007-09-04 17:18 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Opera's interface
by johnnysaucepn on Tue 4th Sep 2007 23:29 in reply to "Opera's interface"
johnnysaucepn Member since:
2006-08-22

My main gripe about Opera is it's interface - it doesn't "blend in" at all on any platform. By this I mean that the widgets, icons and the file dialog look, feel and behave different than the platform's native ones.
[...]
Now, please don't tell me about skins. They're not a solution to this problem (or problems). They're actually the source of this problem (at least partly).

Actually, on Windows it does blend in - the default setup include a Windows Native skin that uses standard elements. I even used to use WindowBlinds to skin it!

Edited 2007-09-04 23:30

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Opera's interface
by terog on Wed 5th Sep 2007 05:49 in reply to "RE: Opera's interface"
terog Member since:
2007-03-09

Actually, on Windows it does blend in - the default setup include a Windows Native skin that uses standard elements. I even used to use WindowBlinds to skin it!

Yeah, but don't those widgets look like the ugly Windows 95 widgets even on Windows XP? So, you still have to skin it ;)

Edited 2007-09-05 05:51

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Opera's interface
by Joe User on Tue 4th Sep 2007 23:32 in reply to "Opera's interface"
Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually, Opera and Firefox both integrate nicely in Windows. The problem is in Linux (obviously). Opera integrates nicely in KDE, and doesn't in Gnome. Firefox integrates beautifully in Gnome but even with the gtk-qt-engine, it doesn't look that well in KDE. The worst in Firefox on Linux are the widgets. "Submit" and "Radio" buttons are so jagged and ugly. There's a fix, I have told the Firefox team about it a few years ago when I started with Linux, but as usual, the request has been discarted. Some one also found a fix:

http://osnovice.blogspot.com/2007/05/firefox-controls-are-ugly.html

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Opera's interface
by terog on Wed 5th Sep 2007 05:42 in reply to "RE: Opera's interface"
terog Member since:
2007-03-09

Actually, Opera and Firefox both integrate nicely in Windows.

Yes, both do it better on Windows, although I'm looking for even better integration.

The problem is in Linux (obviously)

The problem is not in "Linux". It *can't* be actually. The real problem is that both browser's main development/target platform is Windows.

Opera integrates nicely in KDE, and doesn't in Gnome.

Maybe better, but not nicely because a) even during the install it complains that it's keyboard shortcuts conflict with KDE's, b) it is almost fully skinned --> doesn't look like a KDE app and c) the file dialog is nothing like the native one. And more...

Firefox integrates beautifully in Gnome but even with the gtk-qt-engine, it doesn't look that well in KDE.

Yes, it integrates better (than Opera) in Gnome but also better in KDE because a) well, IMO the gtk-qt works very well with the widgets, b) there are quite qood themes to get the KDE icons for Firefox and c) it's possible to use the *native* KDE file dialog in Firefox. And more...

However, it's rare that a distribution has done all these tweaks for you so it's a PITA.

Here is a good howto for integrating Firefox in KDE:
http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_Integrate_Firefox_with_KDE

The worst in Firefox on Linux are the widgets. "Submit" and "Radio" buttons are so jagged and ugly. There's a fix, I have told the Firefox team about it a few years ago when I started with Linux, but as usual, the request has been discarted. Some one also found a fix:

Yes, this is a long standing bug in Firefox. Thanks for the link.

Reply Parent Score: 3