Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 17th Sep 2007 15:17 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Legal Microsoft suffered a stunning defeat on Monday when a European Union court backed a European Commission ruling that the US software giant illegally abused its market power to crush competitors. The European Union's second-highest court dismissed the company's appeal on all substantive points of the 2004 antitrustruling. The court said Microsoft, the world's largest software maker, was unjustified in tying new applications to its Windows operating system in a way that harmed consumer choice. The verdict, which may be appealed only on points of law and not of fact, could force Microsoft to change its business practices.
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RE: Bundled Apps Uninstallation
by dylansmrjones on Mon 17th Sep 2007 16:33 UTC in reply to "Bundled Apps Uninstallation"
dylansmrjones
Member since:
2005-10-02

EU is saying that. That's why Microsoft is allowed to distribute a version of Windows with WMP.

Because Microsoft also ships a version with WMP disabled (I don't think it's actually removed as such - just made inaccessible, AFAIK).

Reply Parent Score: 3

dmantione Member since:
2005-07-06

They did remove WMP. The EU wanted all middleware removed (codecs, directshow) and gave a list of files that were not allowed in XP-N. Yes, Microsoft has claimed it was impossible, but it turned out to be easy for them.

Edited 2007-09-17 16:46

Reply Parent Score: 2

MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

"They did remove WMP. The EU wanted all middleware removed (codecs, directshow) and gave a list of files that were not allowed in XP-N. Yes, Microsoft has claimed it was impossible, but it turned out to be easy for them. "

Does XP-N really lack the DirectShow api? A lot of apps rely on that API. That's like Apple removing the QuickTime api from Mac OS and OSX. I know in my Mac programming days we did make use of the QuickTime API, and relied on the fact that it was built-in. If a Mac user removes the QuickTime subsystem, he'll find lots of thinks break.

My point is, whlie removing DirecShow might not be technically "impossible", it is "impossible" from a practical standpoint, since there are apps that rely on it. Same with any other OS API. Do we really want to get into the business where big government decides what APIs and OS can support?

Reply Parent Score: -1