Linked by David Adams on Tue 4th Dec 2007 19:39 UTC, submitted by michuk
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "It may be a brave opinion but I predict that Ubuntu Linux and Windows Vista are going to be the two operating systems that will take over the largest chunk of the desktop OS market during the next couple of years. This comparison is based on my experience with both systems during the last couple of weeks on two different computers."
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RE[2]: Give it some time
by autumnlover on Tue 4th Dec 2007 22:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Give it some time"
autumnlover
Member since:
2007-04-12

Well I BLAME LINUX when it comes to hardware.

Why ? Here is latest example from experiences of mine:

Recently I managed to get Nokia 6610 GSM phone to be recognised by Ubuntu via some no-name IrDA interface and third party software.

Transfering files from and to phone works ok. But when I tried to use it as an "emergency Internet connection" it failed to connect via GPRS, despite of other people used the same scripts successfully and with the same GSM network as I tried.

By the way - as far as I remember way of connecting to Internet using Windows 3.1 and dial-up modem (software was called "trumpet winsock" or something) it was much easier than under Ubuntu and GPRS nowadays.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Give it some time
by Morgan on Wed 5th Dec 2007 11:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Give it some time"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

The problem with support for any hardware at all on Linux and other non-monopoly operating systems can usually be attributed to one or both of the following:

1. Lack of the hardware manufacturer's desire to write drivers for and/or support those OSes and

2. Lack of any open source developers interested enough in the particular hardware to write an OSS driver worth installing.

When both issues are present at once, usually with obscure but neccessary hardware, you end up with next to no support at all. Attitudes need to change on both sides of the fence before we get really good drivers, whether binary and manufacturer-supported or OSS and community-supported. Of course, what we really want is for the manufacturers to not only provide native OSS drivers but also to support said drivers. That very rarely happens but when it does (example: HP printers) it's a wonderful thing.

I long for the day when a big-name manufacturer will step up there and provide fully open-source friendly laptops and desktops that are 100% supported by Linux. Dell has come close with its Ubuntu offerings, but they are nothing more than their "Designed for Windows Vista" systems that are the most compatible with Linux. When it comes down to it, the various components that make up the PCs as a whole, each from a different manufacturer (mainboard, wifi card, video adapter, etc.), cause a significant roadblock to the above stated goal of 100% OSS compatibility. Even Apple computers have parts made by several different manufacturers, and are simply assembled under the Apple name and supported by Apple at the end of the production timeline.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Give it some time
by lemur2 on Wed 5th Dec 2007 11:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Give it some time"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I long for the day when a big-name manufacturer will step up there and provide fully open-source friendly laptops and desktops that are 100% supported by Linux.


Lenovo will sell you such a machine, and so will HP.

But really, all you need to do is look for certain chipsets.

For example, I found out that an Acer laptop I was looking at had an Intel graphics accelerator, and an Intel wireless chipset ... so I was pretty confident that it would support Linux 100% out-of-the-box including 3D graphics acceleration, and I was not mistaken.

I recommended this laptop to a friend who was looking to build up a Linux setup, and I told that friend to also get a bog-standard wireless router (I think it was d-link) & ADSL modem combined, and also to buy an HP inkjet printer (they chose a Photosmart).

The result - 100% Linux compatible laptop with printer and Internet and full application suite - all installed out-of-the-box from a single liveCD - at less than half the cost of an equivalent Windows setup to do the exact same tasks.

ATI graphics is also on the way to becoming open source, so perhaps by next year these cards also will have 100% 3D graphics support out-of-the-box.

If you are wondering if a given wireless chipset has an open-source driver, this list may help:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_open_source_wireless_dri...

Edited 2007-12-05 11:59

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Give it some time
by wirespot on Wed 5th Dec 2007 22:55 in reply to "RE[2]: Give it some time"
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

Transfering files from and to phone works ok. But when I tried to use it as an "emergency Internet connection" it failed to connect via GPRS, despite of other people used the same scripts successfully and with the same GSM network as I tried.


And Linux is at fault here because... Oh wait, it's not. Nokia refuses to document the inner workings of their phones and the protocols they use so Linux devs need to reverse engineer them. You should not be able to do anything with a Nokia phone on Linux. The fact that you're able to do something is remarcable.

By the way - as far as I remember way of connecting to Internet using Windows 3.1 and dial-up modem (software was called "trumpet winsock" or something) it was much easier than under Ubuntu and GPRS nowadays.


You either enjoy being tortured or your memory's not what it used to be in your old age. Because I remember that setting that up was a complete nightmare.

But tell you what, why don't you go back to using Windows 3.1 if you like it better than Ubuntu 7.10?

Edited 2007-12-05 22:58

Reply Parent Score: 2