Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Dec 2007 06:25 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Qt Jambi ships as a single Java library, or JAR (Java Archive) file, plus a handful of tools, including an interface layout and design tool, and an Eclipse plug-in. Trolltech uses its vaunted Qt C++ library as the GUI engine and puts Java wrappers around it. This approach uses the JNI (Java Native Interface) to call the necessary functions from Java. More here.
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RE: mixed feelings
by leos on Fri 7th Dec 2007 17:04 UTC in reply to "mixed feelings"
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

So paying for a GUI library does not fit very well with the general Java atmosphere.


Yeah it all depends on whether the classes are worth the money. As a C++ developer, Qt is easily worth the money. It is so far above any other C++ toolkit out there that I believe I get my money back in gained productivity very quickly.
In Java you already have classes for network/sql/xml/file/etc access in the standard class library so a lot of Qt is not strictly necessary.

Trolltech seems to realize this and charges significantly less for Jambi than the C++ version of Qt ($1780-$3560 vs $3300-$6600).

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: mixed feelings
by anda_skoa on Fri 7th Dec 2007 18:00 in reply to "RE: mixed feelings"
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

In Java you already have classes for network/sql/xml/file/etc access in the standard class library so a lot of Qt is not strictly necessary.


This is often missed by people who refer to Qt as "GUI Toolkit".

Qt is to C++ what the Java Classlibrary is to Java.
So obviously on Java, where it basically is just a "GUI Toolkit", there is a lot less need for it.

Interestingly, dispite only a small portion of Qt being of additional value for a Java developer, it is still considered for just its GUI portion.

Reply Parent Score: 2