Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 12th Jan 2008 20:32 UTC, submitted by Excel Hearts Choi
Gentoo Daniel Robbins, original creator of the Gentoo project, offers a solution to fix the recent leadership crisis at Gentoo: "I have received permission from my employer to return and serve as President of the Gentoo Foundation, renew its charter, and then work in some capacity to help to get Gentoo going in the right direction from a legal, community and technical perspective."
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RE: I hope this works out
by sbergman27 on Sun 13th Jan 2008 00:34 UTC in reply to "I hope this works out"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Nothing against anyone in the Gentoo camp, but when Robbins ran it, it was the Ubuntu of its day.


What? It might have been the easiest of the source based distros, but it was still the sort of thing that you waited for a three day weekend, for which you had nothing else planned, to try to install. Hardly "the Ubuntu of its day".

I can recommend Ubuntu to nontechnical users. I would *never* have even considered recommending Gentoo.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: I hope this works out
by Morgan on Sun 13th Jan 2008 02:15 in reply to "RE: I hope this works out"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I may be wrong, but I'm fairly sure he meant "the Ubuntu of its day" in reference to the strong community and overall popularity of the distro back then. Certainly, it was the distro you went with if you wanted source-based control without the needless headaches of "roll your own" or the various obscure source-based distros out there.

And think about this too: Would Ubuntu be so great, so powerful and so easy to use if it wasn't for the unprecedented community involvement with the project? The users truly do make the system what it is, and whether you like Ubuntu or hate it, the user base helps to make it a good distro all around.

While I don't run Gentoo myself (I've recently converted to OS X for the second time), I sincerely hope that it can come back into the mix stronger and better.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: I hope this works out
by DigitalAxis on Sun 13th Jan 2008 04:39 in reply to "RE: I hope this works out"
DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

On the other hand, when things get confusing and technical, I've seen links on the Ubuntu forums to Gentoo documentation.

Someone suggested in a previous article that they thought Gentoo would become the launching point for a thousand distributions due to its amazingly flexible nature... I'd say their documentation has been their real gift to the Linux world.

Edited 2008-01-13 04:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: I hope this works out
by sbergman27 on Sun 13th Jan 2008 12:00 in reply to "RE[2]: I hope this works out"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

On the other hand, when things get confusing and technical, I've seen links on the Ubuntu forums to Gentoo documentation.




I do not think that anyone would find fault with Gentoo documentation. But when things get confusing and technical, Ubuntu makes it less confusing and technical, whereas Gentoo just writes even *more* documentation. The best documentation is that which is never needed because the software explains itself. This is not to say that one could not point to a a zillion (but declining) things in Ubuntu that *are* more confusing than they should be. But if so, one could probably point to 10 zillion in Gentoo. I'm sure Gentoo is great for people who want to learn about all the nuts and bolts. But they are really two completely different distributions for two completely different kinds of people.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: I hope this works out
by de_wizze on Sun 13th Jan 2008 15:31 in reply to "RE[2]: I hope this works out"
de_wizze Member since:
2005-10-31

I agree with the value of documentation. Another place gentoo could will provide a lot of value to other communities is really when it comes to the processes they develop for quality assurance.

My understanding and experience has always been that when compiling from source you get to uncover more design flaws and obscure bugs than other cases. With good documentation, which they are somewhat known for now and a focus on developing guidelines for proper quality assurance, regression/unit testing and effective bug reporting I think they so much more to offer.

I talk as someone who used gentoo and see how that experience helped me along the way. Also one should never under estimate the value of having access to knowledgeable people who are willing to share their wisdom and understanding, none of this our way or the high way crap I seem to be picking up.

In the early day’s gentoo was more about sharing advanced concepts in a down to earth manner with tips and articles and options presented to with a clear explanation of the differences (why you may want to use this kernel, that logging application or a host of other alternatives). I am not sure how pervasive the recent trends of removing options instead of accommodating choose and waiting out instead of embracing new advances is but it feels nothing like what it used to.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I hope this works out
by WereCatf on Sun 13th Jan 2008 16:33 in reply to "RE[2]: I hope this works out"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

On the other hand, when things get confusing and technical, I've seen links on the Ubuntu forums to Gentoo documentation.

I have not been browsing Ubuntu forums since I am not a Ubuntu user, but I too have seen in quite a few places links to Gentoo howtos. I guess it's because Gentoo people have seen quite an effort in creting all those howtos, they're usually quite good quality, and they can be followed on almost any distro provided you install the correct tools.

So, in essence, even though people don't ever use Gentoo they are still benefitting a lot from it ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3