Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Jan 2008 14:41 UTC, submitted by superstoned
KDE "I think it's really necessary to respond to some criticism seen on the reactions to the latest OSnews article. I won't go into the article itself, imho it's rather negative, but hey. From an user's perspective, it makes sense to only review 3 or 4 parts of KDE 4 and complain about them, and ignore all the other brilliant pieces of work in there, right? On to the responses, I found this reaction by dagw to be the most typical. Well. That's painful. So, is he right? Did we make the wrong decision? Let's look at it from a broader perspective for a while. Let's see it in the Grand Scheme of Things to Come."
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i don't get it
by vege on Mon 14th Jan 2008 15:01 UTC
vege
Member since:
2006-04-07

I don't get why release version numbers are so important. You won't drop or use it becouse of a number. You will decide if it is for you or not.

As long as it is not a forced update, so it simply just does not metter how they call it.

I hope, 4.1 will be a pack I'd like to use. 4.0 is not. I'm not confused - woo-hoo! ;)

Reply Score: 6

RE: i don't get it
by Luminair on Mon 14th Jan 2008 15:39 in reply to "i don't get it"
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

"You won't drop or use it becouse of a number."

Do you really believe that the version of a software does not factor into the decision to use it?

I know some people who disagree with you. They don't use alpha and beta software. Those words "alpha" and "beta" mean something. They mean that the software isn't finished.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: i don't get it
by Vanders on Mon 14th Jan 2008 16:38 in reply to "i don't get it"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

Back in the good old days you could actually use the version number as some sort of indication of how complete and stable the software was. A 0.x version or Alpha release was not feature complete, a Beta release was complete but probably had bugs, an RC was actually a condidate for release and an x.0 release was the first feature complete release considered to stable.

This system is good and it had developed and is used for a reason. As a developer, and a user, I don't expect anything less than an stable release to actually be stable. I know that if I pick a library which is still in Alpha, the API may change and cause me work in the future. I know that if I use that financial software that is in Beta it may crash and I risk the chance of losing data.

It seems the current trend is for version number inflation. Alphas have become "Betas", Betas are "Release Candidates" and Release Candidates are x.0 releases. Apparently even that is not enough now, and projects are skipping right ahead to "Release" without mucking about with all that stable APIs and bug testing nonsense. That's boring!

Releasing KDE as 4.0.0 and then claiming it is "a developer release" is just odd. There used to be a name for "developer releases". It was "Alpha".

Edited 2008-01-14 16:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: i don't get it
by mat69 on Mon 14th Jan 2008 17:18 in reply to "RE: i don't get it"
mat69 Member since:
2006-03-29

What do you mean with back in the good old days?
Kernel 2.6.0 days? KDE 2.0 days or even more back, like Windows 3.0 days?

I have the feeling that a lot of people have a concept on what an alpha, a beta or a final release should be. If a release does not fit into that concept they argue that the devs made a mistake.

It would be nice if more people would read and understand KDE's release concept here. This would solve a lot of the questions and fears posted here as well as the reports of lack of features et al.

So please let the KDE devs sound their own release concept and accept their concept for their product.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: i don't get it
by aseigo on Mon 14th Jan 2008 18:41 in reply to "RE: i don't get it"
aseigo Member since:
2005-07-06

i'm sure you'll have a lot of time to consider how that all came to change as you ride into town in your horse drawn buggy so that you can send a telegram and put a mail order in to Sears-Roebuck by post.

life is not static.

Reply Parent Score: 5