Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Feb 2008 21:32 UTC, submitted by Flatland_Spider
Linux The Linux Foundation has posted the second half of its long and thorough interview with Linux founder Linus Torvalds, part of the Foundation's 'open voices' podcast. While the first part of the interview focused on the Linux development community, this time Torvalds sounds off on everything from patents and innovation to the future of Linux. According to Torvalds the reason Linux hasn't taken off is that most people are happy with the way things are. "If you act differently from Windows, even if you act in some ways better, it doesn't matter; better is worse if it's different." Torvalds also attributes much of the frustration with Windows Vista to this same idea. In other words, it's not that Vista is worse than XP, but it's different and that causes distress among users.
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RE[2]: Its true
by siraf72 on Wed 13th Feb 2008 06:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Its true"
siraf72
Member since:
2006-02-22

Agree with the point about Ecosystem. But to me THE most basic reason as I have stated before is Marketing. Most people are vaguely aware of something called Linux and that's about it. How many sales guys in a computer store will try and sell you a linux box?

Its this that's stopping linux growing.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Its true
by Coxy on Wed 13th Feb 2008 09:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Its true"
Coxy Member since:
2006-07-01

'Most people are vaguely aware of something called Linux'

Are they? Are they really? Go to a shopping centre near you, go up to someone you don't know and show them the Ubuntu logo. Or just ask them if they know what Ubuntu is. Or what Linux is.

You'll find that hardly anyone is 'aware' of Linux outside of sites like this, and other geeky places.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Its true
by SReilly on Wed 13th Feb 2008 11:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Its true"
SReilly Member since:
2006-12-28

When I go to the pub and tell people that I work in IT, they usually end up asking me what kind of IT work I do. When I mention Linux, they more often than not have heard of it and sometimes want to know more about it.

Linux is fast gaining 'brand' recognition for people involved in the stock market and bank managers all the way down to home computer systems users. I doubt the Linux adoption wall is in Linux being unheard of.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Its true
by siraf72 on Wed 13th Feb 2008 12:45 in reply to "RE[3]: Its true"
siraf72 Member since:
2006-02-22

fair enough, you just re-enforced the point I was trying to make. what i'm saying is Linux is getting more and more coverage in the news but apart from being Somefink to do wiv computers. people don't know much about it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Its true
by Quag7 on Wed 13th Feb 2008 17:08 in reply to "RE[3]: Its true"
Quag7 Member since:
2005-07-28

Most people I know have heard of it but have only a hazy idea of what it is.

Most people only have a hazy idea of what an Operating System is.

Brand recognition in any case, not as high as it could be. I still don't think I'm insane for the idea that a TV spot would do Linux a world of good. A spot which *showed* the desktop - maybe showed several Windows managers and showed that there was a choice, and then throw in the cubey spinny translucent blingy stuff the kids dig nowadays. Generate buzz.

Maybe get Paris Hilton. Paris Hilton and Richard Stallman. Together. Nude in a hot tub. Stallman and Hilton nude will definitely make for water cooler conversations. Maybe slightly stilted, uncomfortable conversation about the meaning of the word "freedom."

Go for the whole angle of money, you know, Linux being free and rich girls liking free stuff so they can hold on to their bling for stuff like ornamental canines.

I like this idea of an uncomfortable conversation between a nude Richard Stallman and Paris Hilton in a soapy hot tub, and then sort of fading out to a black screen as white letters fade in, in silence:

GNU

And then a penguin.

It may not be the Mac 1984 commercial but it will definitely be a WTF moment which will stick in peoples minds. And that's better than "Linux, what, that's like, Lyndon LaRouche and them, right?"

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Its true
by kaiwai on Wed 13th Feb 2008 20:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Its true"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

'Most people are vaguely aware of something called Linux'

Are they? Are they really? Go to a shopping centre near you, go up to someone you don't know and show them the Ubuntu logo. Or just ask them if they know what Ubuntu is. Or what Linux is.

You'll find that hardly anyone is 'aware' of Linux outside of sites like this, and other geeky places.


Those who are vaguely aware are the same people who know what UNIX is; a piece of software run on big powerful computers, they assume because they sound they same, they must be alike - hence the question I get asked, "oh, is that the same thing as UNIX?"

People know about Linux, but when they can't get Photoshop Elements for the new gizmo digital camera they bought, or they can't install the latest piece of stationery making software with the easy to use wizards which makes complex layout easy - is there any wonder people aren't moving to Linux?

People want to be able to go, purchase a machine, and then know they can go into any shop around the world and purchase software for it; contra to the BS being spread here, the vast majority still go to shops (shopping is a social experience for most people) and purchase their hardware and software (hence Dell's now presence within retail stores, something they trialed first in NZ (which is the guinea pig market due to our relatively small size and quick adoption of new technology)). They want to know that they can grab a random device off the shelf and know that not only is the hardware supported but there are bundled applications included with the device which makes the device useful. Again, this is where Linux fall flat.

When I moved to Mac OS X - the original move was because I wanted a UNIX operating system with access to mainstream applications like Microosft Office. Here I am in 2008, with my IIRC 4th Mac (MacBook) and what made me stay? iLife and iWorks. Apple is just continuing to expand - their latest offering, Bento, the $50 database for end users.

People here crap on going, "oh, I can do that with this rigged with this, and that glued with that, and blah blah blah" ignoring the fact the end user doesn't care. They don't want to do all that, that is why they purchase software, they push the responsibility for providing what they need on someone else, hence the reason why we have a software industry rather than everyone just sitting around learning how to become programmers and writing their own custom applications.

People here, I think, have lost touch with reality and what end users actually want. They're too concerned with looking down from their ivory towers than accepting that computers to the average user are a means to an end. They want to get in and out as fast as possible. The hours of procrastination which might excite some geeks and boffins on this site might get the heart racing, but for the vast majority of end users, that sort of procrastination is ass paralysingly painful and worthless - they have better things to worry about than doing the job of a software programmer or a systems integrator.

Edited 2008-02-13 20:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[4]: Its true
by KugelKurt on Wed 13th Feb 2008 22:23 in reply to "RE[3]: Its true"
KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

Lots of people actually heard of something called "Linux". Not so many used it, but they heard of it. It depends, of course, on the age of the persons. A 80yr old granny won't know about Linux, but a 30yr old male from the social middle class will very likely have heard about Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2