Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Feb 2008 22:32 UTC
FreeBSD FreeBSD 7.0 has been released. "The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 7.0-RELEASE. This is the first release from the 7-STABLE branch which introduces many new features along with many improvements to functionality present in the earlier branches."
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WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

I am just a bit curious about BSD atm so I have a few things I'd like to ask.. Does "FreeBSD" name mean that there will be no proprietary software to be available from the Ports tree? I'd rather have it available, I don't really have anything against proprietary software. And well, would FreeBSD (or such) have any advantages over a Linux installation? I've understood that in the end they're pretty much alike.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

No the name FreeBSD hasn't anything to do with the strange belief of some GNUish people. It has something to do with the first *free* BSD. The daemon is free -> FreeBSD. So you will find anything possible in the ports.

>And well, would FreeBSD (or such) have any advantages over a Linux installation?

-different development model (quality first, quantity last - long testing cycles)
-ports (18.000+ applications and so on without the system included like in all Linux distros (userland))
-development of the whole operating system from the same team (no Babylonian-like devlopment)
-30 years of history in development of an UNIX system
-nice code and a real documentation (handbook, code etc.) -> superior quality and reliability
-BSDL (free as in real freedom aka you can do with it whatever you want)
-no need to recompile applications between releases
-no breaking ABIs

and so on. Of course you'll not see any difference while using KDE etc. but you'll see the difference while working with FreeBSD. It is just a difference to work with a free UNIX-derivative. And if it is "too hard" just use DesktopBSD. A 100% compatible FreeBSD but preconfigured for the beginner (64bit too).

http://www.desktopbsd.net

Edited 2008-02-28 17:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

lifeforms Member since:
2006-05-22

Oh no, not at all. FreeBSD is one of the most pragmatic BSD's. Pretty much everything is in the ports tree.

From a end user's perspective, there's not much difference between Linux and FreeBSD. You can run the same software and most of the commands are alike. Some years, Linux will be faster on some workloads, then the next year FreeBSD will overtake it, et cetera...

My personal preference still remains FreeBSD, because I like the unified approach. File locations, command names, manpages, and handbook are all very consistent. It feels very thought out, and stuff doesn't change around. With Linux, I often felt that I had to learn a whole new OS every few years... Now, I generally only use Linux for running VMware.

But, both are very stable, both are very good, and they get the job done!

Reply Parent Score: 7

Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

File locations, command names, manpages, and handbook are all very consistent. It feels very thought out, and stuff doesn't change around.


I'd like to add the high quality of the manpages. They do not only cover system tools, they include documentations for programming interfaces, libraries, system calls and maintenance procedures.

Furthermore, the source code of the FreeBSD OS is very tidy and well structured and documented. The source is of high quality, too.

Reply Parent Score: 2

rhavenn Member since:
2006-05-12

I am just a bit curious about BSD atm so I have a few things I'd like to ask.. Does "FreeBSD" name mean that there will be no proprietary software to be available from the Ports tree? I'd rather have it available, I don't really have anything against proprietary software. And well, would FreeBSD (or such) have any advantages over a Linux installation? I've understood that in the end they're pretty much alike.


The only thing you're not going to find that really is a killer for most people is native Flash support. Gnash works somewhat and the Linux emulation Firefox and Flash works okay, but crashes a lot and audio is crappy. I wish Adobe would just release a "framework" or something to let people port to other systems if they don't want to do it. If Java can go open source I'm sure Flash can as well.

Reply Parent Score: 1