Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Mar 2008 21:38 UTC, submitted by SReilly
Novell and Ximian Open-source pioneer and Novell Vice President Miguel de Icaza Thursday for the first time publicly slammed his company's cross-patent licensing agreement with Microsoft as he defended himself against lack of patent protection for third parties that distribute his company's Moonlight project, which ports Microsoft's Silverlight technology to Linux.
Thread beginning with comment 303978
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[6]: Interesting
by PlatformAgnostic on Sat 8th Mar 2008 23:33 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Interesting"
PlatformAgnostic
Member since:
2006-01-02

Why isn't most of that 16MB shared? If mono is intelligently built, all of the core libraries and the runtime should be AOT-compiled images which are shareable. The libraries of Tomboy should also be compiled this way, so that the only private memory would be the GC segments. In steady-state operation (no one writing tons of notes and deleting them), no GCs will be happening, and most of the GC segments would be paged out.

Is 16 MB really the reference set of Tomboy?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Interesting
by sbergman27 on Sun 9th Mar 2008 00:27 in reply to "RE[6]: Interesting"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

Is 16 MB really the reference set of Tomboy?


33 MB resident with 18 MB shared as I check right now. So about 33MB + 15MB per additional user. That's on a 32bit box. Slightly higher on a 64 bit box. With swap on, RES - SHR decreases to more like 10MB. Which still makes it a pig of a post-it note app... just as Beagle is a pig of an indexer. I have never even considered allowing F-Spot, so I don't know how bad that is.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: Interesting
by PlatformAgnostic on Sun 9th Mar 2008 00:31 in reply to "RE[7]: Interesting"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

There is certainly a lot of room for optimization there, then!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Interesting
by PlatformAgnostic on Sun 9th Mar 2008 21:47 in reply to "RE[7]: Interesting"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

Rereading your post made me think of another question...

Why would you run your system with swap off? When you say swap off, do you mean that the OS has no place to page to besides the original executable images for memory that's not in use?

Reply Parent Score: 2