Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 21st Mar 2008 21:49 UTC
Editorial "I used KDE as my primary desktop from 1996 through 2006, when I installed the GNOME version of Ubuntu and found that I liked it better than the KDE desktop I'd faced every morning for so many years. Last January, I got a new Dell Latitude D630 laptop and decided to install Kubuntu on it, but within a few weeks, I went back to GNOME. Does this mean GNOME is now a better desktop than KDE, or just that I have become so accustomed to GNOME that it's hard for me to give it up?"
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elsewhere
Member since:
2005-07-13

I administer about a hundred Linux desktops on XDMCP/NX servers. And believe me, copying around config files to change settings is *not* as easy as it gets. Not granular enough. I need more control and fine-grained configurability than that.

I use gconftool-2 scripts. But for larger chunks of config, I believe you can --dump particular branches of gconf to xml and then load them to various accounts. For example:

gconftool-2 --dump /apps/evolution > evolution.xml
gconftool-2 --load=evolution.xml

Or say you just wanted calendar settings:

gconftool-2 --dump /apps/evolution/calendar > calendar.xml

Copying around config files sounds like something out of the DOS dark ages.


You're arguing that gconftool is somehow slicker than cp .kde/share/config/whatever destination. Different strokes for different folks.

In fact, to be pedantic, if you're administering multiple clients, then KDE's Kiosk infrastructure is optimized for that, and has been for some time. That's why the config file structure is set up the way it is. It has a hierarchy that gives you the adminstrator granular control over the user setup, and application configurations, and the extent that they can change it.

I guess it's the difference between copying chunks of gfconf settings and pasting them into multiple accounts, or simply setting up one or more profiles and applying it to multiple accounts. Again, different strokes. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

You're arguing that gconftool is somehow slicker than cp .kde/share/config/whatever destination.

Absolutely. Try setting Suzzie's default home page, and make her pdf viewer default to full screen using cp.

Different strokes for different folks.

No. Necessary granularity and flexibility for the admin.

In fact, to be pedantic, if you're administering multiple clients, then KDE's Kiosk infrastructure is optimized for that,

Perhaps. But the DE needs to work for both the admin and the users. KDE might be great for me. But although I keep an eye on it, try out each new release, and respect some of the technology, it is nowhere near suitable for my users. And I would not subject them to it.

Edited 2008-03-23 18:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kokopelli Member since:
2005-07-06


Absolutely. Try setting Suzzie's default home page, and make her pdf viewer default to full screen using cp.

sed is your friend assuming you want it only for one user. $I if you want it global.


No. Necessary granularity and flexibility for the admin.


familiarity perhaps but a entry in a config file is just as granular as a gconf value.

Perhaps. But the DE needs to work for both the admin and the users. KDE might be great for me. But although I keep an eye on it, try out each new release, and respect some of the technology, it is nowhere near suitable for my users. And I would not subject them to it.


I won't disagree with you since you know your users. For one thing converting from gnome to KDE would be traumatic and unnecessary. Assuming you were starting from the beginning though, without a trained user base, what features in gnome make it more suitable than KDE3 in the environment you run? I am not fighting for KDE here. KDE4 is utterly unsuitable for now and KDE3 is on the way out. I am just curious what the limitations you hit are. The one obvious distinction that comes to mind is Epiphany versus Konqueror. Konq is nice but also crash happy, especially if flash is involved. I also can understand the argument for gconftool, though I would say that it is a matter of familiarity more than granularity. What else?

Ah well, maybe we could revisit the subject in about 2-4 years after KDE4 has had a time to claw its way into the sunlight.

Reply Parent Score: 3