Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 29th Mar 2008 23:02 UTC
Features, Office Version 2.4 of the OpenOffice productivity suite was released on Thursday, boasting enhancements to all its core components. Possibly the most significant alteration in the new version of the free suite is in the description of file types. The 'OpenDocument' description has been replaced by 'ODF', which stands for 'OpenDocument Format' and is becoming a well-known acronym thanks to rivalry with Microsoft's controversial OOXML format.
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RE[3]: New features
by sbergman27 on Sun 30th Mar 2008 02:09 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: New features"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Damn those whining users that you're being paid to support and help to do their job. Always whining and not using *my* preferred software.

1. They are not paying me. Their employers are. And they appreciate not having to shell out for 60+ MS Office licenses + upgrades.

2. The other 60 some odd users have no problems or complaints about using OO.o and are able to do their jobs just fine. The one employee in question is also quite able to do her job with the current tools available. Drag 'n Drop column rearrangement, available in 2.4, is a nice convenience, but the lack in 2.3 is simply not a show stopper.

Nice try, but my professional conscience is quite clear.

Edited 2008-03-30 02:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 20

v RE[4]: New features
by sappyvcv on Sun 30th Mar 2008 02:45 in reply to "RE[3]: New features"
RE[5]: New features
by sbergman27 on Sun 30th Mar 2008 03:07 in reply to "RE[4]: New features"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

The employer should be more than willing to pay for a MS Office license if

Sappyvcv,

Start your own business. Hire your own employees. Spend your own money on them. Give them whatever they ask for if that's what you want. I promise I won't try to stop you.

Reply Parent Score: 14

RE[5]: New features
by pjafrombbay on Sun 30th Mar 2008 03:12 in reply to "RE[4]: New features"
pjafrombbay Member since:
2005-07-31

The employer should be more than willing to pay for a MS Office license if that's what their employee wants to use. It's not an unreasonable request. And who the employer pays to support their users shouldn't be a holier than thou snob when they do have to support someone using software they do not prefer.

What a lode of old cobblers! You have either never been in the PC user support business or you are a Microsoft employee or apologist. How stupid is that to suggest that users in a business be able to select their own software! Why not hardware as well? Who cares if nobody can communicate with anyone else? Contribute by all means but have something sensible to say.

Peter

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[4]: New features
by hobgoblin on Sun 30th Mar 2008 10:01 in reply to "RE[3]: New features"
hobgoblin Member since:
2005-07-06

i think its mostly "mental muscle" pains thats being complained about.

as in, being able to do something is a way builds up muscle memory, and when that memory and reality no longer match, some people will complain, quite vocally often, but will (hopefully) keep on doing what they are paid to do.

this is one reason why we have "tech inertia"...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: New features
by andrewg on Sun 30th Mar 2008 10:59 in reply to "RE[3]: New features"
andrewg Member since:
2005-07-06

I use OpenOffice at home. Its is getting better, but its a long way from being at the point where I would prefer it over MS Office. For a business the money is well worth it and my when I purchase my next notebook I will be purchasing Office 2007.

I always find it hard to comprehend. Businesses spend obscene amounts of money on their employees salaries, medical, etc and then they get them some old computer with cheap peripherals. In the case of your company they give a fraction on software of the employee's total cost to company and in doing so give them an inferior product.

If you value you're time and want the best then MS Office is the only competitor right now and I have tried most if not all except the latest version of iWork but that does not run on Windows or Linux so I can't use it anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: New features
by iangibson on Sun 30th Mar 2008 12:54 in reply to "RE[4]: New features"
iangibson Member since:
2005-09-25

I agree that OpenOffice still has a way to go to be technically equivalent to MS Office (especially in terms of speed), and that you should use the software that is best for your business.

Having said that, you could still consider recommending OO to friends and colleagues with less exacting needs (e.g. for home use) - if Microsoft's monopoly is finally broken and we get a genuinely open file format in common use, it will be good for everyone (except Microsoft) - you will find that the price of MS Office itself will come down, and with a more level playing field new competitors will be more likely to write their own office suites, further increasing competition, quality and choice.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: New features
by evangs on Sun 30th Mar 2008 17:45 in reply to "RE[4]: New features"
evangs Member since:
2005-07-07


I always find it hard to comprehend. Businesses spend obscene amounts of money on their employees salaries, medical, etc and then they get them some old computer with cheap peripherals. In the case of your company they give a fraction on software of the employee's total cost to company and in doing so give them an inferior product.


I fully agree with what you've said and the quoted part of your post sums up exactly why OO doesn't make a huge dent in the corporate space. Companies are there to make money. If a good computer + software make their employees more productive, why not just buy them the software they need? If you begrudge your employees $500 software (much less if you get a site license) that gets upgraded every 3 - 4 years, you need to start reevaluating your business.

Reply Parent Score: 1