Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th May 2008 14:49 UTC
Windows We have learnt quite a lot about Windows 7 this week, and one of the things was that Windows 7 would not get a new kernel. The call for a new kernel has been made a few times on the internet, but anyone with a bit more insight into Windows' kernel knows that there is absolutely no need to write a new kernel for Windows - the problems with Windows lie in userland, not kernelland. While the authenticity of the Shipping Seven blog is not undisputed, the blogger makes some very excellent points regarding the kernel matter.
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Comment by UZ64
by UltraZelda64 on Fri 30th May 2008 16:29 UTC
UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

"The call for a new kernel has been made a few times on the internet, but anyone with a bit more insight into Windows' kernel knows that there is absolutely no need to write a new kernel for Windows - the problems with Windows lie in userland, not kernelland."

Is this still as true as it used to be in the days of Vista? In the days of an ultra-paranoid kernel wasting half its time making sure a user doesn't try viewing or listening to the contents of a media file just in case it's "not authorized"? I recall hearing this stuff was so deeply entrenched in the kernel, the chances of Microsoft even bothering to remove this was next to zero (although I suspect the big reason is they already promised the big **AAs).

I honestly do not believe ANYTHING about DRM has any business deep down in the kernel... but that's the way Windows is going. Good thing there's Linux. And yes, I would take the inability to play that crap, period, over having my computer actively trying to police me. Never did give a damn about movies for the most part, and thankfully, audio CDs aren't mangled with DRM.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by UZ64
by PlatformAgnostic on Fri 30th May 2008 17:02 in reply to "Comment by UZ64"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

I work on the Windows Kernel and I can tell you that no piece of NT that actively snoops on what you're doing and tries to protect content-proucers' rights. There are a few features (I can think of 3 of them), which make implementing a DRM system in user programs and drivers a little easier, but none of them have a performance impact when not in use.

Here's one that actually helps performance: Protected Processes are created as a unit from kernel mode, unlike the normal processes in older versions of Windows, where they are created piecemeal through cross-address-space writes. The new method is actually faster, so all process creation goes through the new path (just without the protected process flag).

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Comment by UZ64
by rockwell on Fri 30th May 2008 17:41 in reply to "RE: Comment by UZ64"
rockwell Member since:
2005-09-13

//sarcasm;
Phooey on your facts. Winblows! MicroShaft! Big Brother! etc. etc. etc.
//sarcasm;

Reply Parent Score: 2

v RE[2]: Comment by UZ64
by shapeshifter on Sat 31st May 2008 06:45 in reply to "RE: Comment by UZ64"
RE: Comment by UZ64
by brandonlive on Sat 31st May 2008 17:03 in reply to "Comment by UZ64"
brandonlive Member since:
2008-05-31

In the days of an ultra-paranoid kernel wasting half its time making sure a user doesn't try viewing or listening to the contents of a media file just in case it's "not authorized"? I recall hearing this stuff was so deeply entrenched in the kernel, the chances of Microsoft even bothering to remove this was next to zero (although I suspect the big reason is they already promised the big **AAs). I honestly do not believe ANYTHING about DRM has any business deep down in the kernel... but that's the way Windows is going. Good thing there's Linux. And yes, I would take the inability to play that crap, period, over having my computer actively trying to police me. Never did give a damn about movies for the most part, and thankfully, audio CDs aren't mangled with DRM.



It's easy to make Window sound bad when you make things up.

Have you ever, ever heard of ANYONE being unable to play a non-DRM'd media file on a Windows PC? Of course not. The only DRM lives in the *PLAYER* - and it only applies when you buy DRM'd content. If you don't want DRM, don't buy any DRM'd content. Simple as that.

Of course the kernel hasn't got anything to do with DRM. How about you think for a second before posting your mindless Linux propaganda?

Edited 2008-05-31 17:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2