Linked by Adam S on Mon 9th Jun 2008 18:59 UTC
Apple Now that the WWDC08 keynote has come and gone, we've learned very little that we didn't already know. The iPhone 3G will be here on July 11, and will retail for $199 for an 8GB phone, $299 for a 16GB phone, available in white or black. OS X 10.6 will, as expected, be code-named "Snow Leopard," additional details to follow for sure. The App Store will feature some amazing new software, and Apple's new MobileMe is mere weeks away. Watch the "read more" link on this story for continued updates from around the web. If you'd like to read the play-by-play on the WWDC announcement, see Macrumors Live. UPDATED within.
Thread beginning with comment 317904
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Comment by Bitterman
by riha on Mon 9th Jun 2008 22:53 UTC in reply to "Comment by Bitterman"
riha
Member since:
2006-01-24

It must be hard to be US citizen, specially when new hardware is released that has functionality that USA has not yet discovered.

Here in Sweden all operators have 3G.

According to an article that was written about 3G coverage in Sweden, the TWO major operators gives 3G to 6 559 087 swedish people, in total there lives 9 182 927 people (year 2007). That is 71% coverage in Sweden only.

As someone else wrote, North America is not the center of the world and definitely NOT the only market for Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Bitterman
by Arun on Mon 9th Jun 2008 23:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bitterman"
Arun Member since:
2005-07-07

It must be hard to be US citizen, specially when new hardware is released that has functionality that USA has not yet discovered.

Here in Sweden all operators have 3G.

According to an article that was written about 3G coverage in Sweden, the TWO major operators gives 3G to 6 559 087 swedish people, in total there lives 9 182 927 people (year 2007). That is 71% coverage in Sweden only.

As someone else wrote, North America is not the center of the world and definitely NOT the only market for Apple.


True Sweden has great 3G coverage. But by your own data Sweden has a fraction of the population of the US and at a fraction of the size area wise. The US also has a lot of older infrastructure items and replacing them is a huge undertaking an order of magnitude higher than Sweden.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Bitterman
by kaiwai on Tue 10th Jun 2008 04:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Bitterman"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

True Sweden has great 3G coverage. But by your own data Sweden has a fraction of the population of the US and at a fraction of the size area wise. The US also has a lot of older infrastructure items and replacing them is a huge undertaking an order of magnitude higher than Sweden.


May I suggest you look at the legislation within the US which makes rolling out technology alot slower and more costly than most other countries. Take high speed broadband, it is illegal to role out the infrastructure in 'wealthy suburbs' first and neglect the poor ones - in otherwords, they're forced to spend billions rolling out services in areas that provide no immediate return on investment.

Cripes, if we had that sort of monumental stupid legislation like that in New Zealand - there wouldn't be a single DSLAM in any exchange in NZ; we'd all be using dial up. Same can be said for mobile phone infrastructure as well. Before you start 'blaming' the geography, how about looking at the stupid legislation that is passed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Bitterman
by kmarst on Tue 10th Jun 2008 05:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Bitterman"
kmarst Member since:
2008-06-10

OK, how about taking a state like Georgia as an example?

Sweden has about the same population as Georgia, but almost 10 times the area. So if the difference in 3G penetration is only because of geography, I expect you to find proof that Georgia has 100% coverage.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Bitterman
by stabbyjones on Tue 10th Jun 2008 01:18 in reply to "RE: Comment by Bitterman"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

Australia can be a good example of 3G coverage.

Not the largest population but the area of coverage to hit +90% of Australian's means a lot of towers. Apparently Optus has the best coverage at 96% of Australian's aiming for 98% in 2009.

Most carriers here have very good 3g coverage and it's become the standard especially in metro areas. There is no way the first gen iphone would have sold well in Australia.

From the looks of it it's going to at least pack a punch with a lot of people now, especially for the price. Assuming there aren't any archaic data plan's it should be a winner.

As far as Aussie data plans go i use 10Mb a month on 3 mobile (Hutchinson) but there are data plans over 50Mb a month last i saw. for browsing in opera mini it's nice and cheap. ($5 extra on my $49 cap)

I'm interested in seeing if HTC can hit the ground running or whether apple can get a foothold. If not, the world will move on back to nokia and sony.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Bitterman
by kaiwai on Tue 10th Jun 2008 04:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Bitterman"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Australia can be a good example of 3G coverage. Not the largest population but the area of coverage to hit +90% of Australian's means a lot of towers. Apparently Optus has the best coverage at 96% of Australian's aiming for 98% in 2009. Most carriers here have very good 3g coverage and it's become the standard especially in metro areas. There is no way the first gen iphone would have sold well in Australia. From the looks of it it's going to at least pack a punch with a lot of people now, especially for the price. Assuming there aren't any archaic data plan's it should be a winner. As far as Aussie data plans go i use 10Mb a month on 3 mobile (Hutchinson) but there are data plans over 50Mb a month last i saw. for browsing in opera mini it's nice and cheap. ($5 extra on my $49 cap) I'm interested in seeing if HTC can hit the ground running or whether apple can get a foothold. If not, the world will move on back to nokia and sony.


That is because Australia can do gradual roll outs of infrastructure; the problem with the US, they have legislation that doesn't allow for that. If you roll out, you have to roll out for the WHOLE area, not just selective parts - under the flawed logic that if they don't force telecommunication companies to do so, it would create 'technology slums'. Yes, it is flawed logic, but try explaining that to Americans on here, its impossible.

Reply Parent Score: 2