Linked by Tony Steidler-Dennison on Mon 7th Jul 2008 18:18 UTC, submitted by Dale Smoker
Linux While I was trawling through Net Applications' operating system share trend data for the past 24 months, something struck me. June 08 marked a big month for Linux. The OS saw the largest increase in market share for the whole 2 year period - a growth of 0.12%.
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RE[3]: Comment by satan666
by CGI_Joe on Tue 8th Jul 2008 02:18 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by satan666"
CGI_Joe
Member since:
2008-02-20

You still had to install that and set that up for her. Also she had windows in a virtual machine to use while she adjusted to Kubuntu. She wouldn't have done any of that on her own. It's a heartfelt anecdote, but it's hardly the typical consumer scenario.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by satan666
by lemur2 on Tue 8th Jul 2008 07:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by satan666"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

You still had to install that and set that up for her. Also she had windows in a virtual machine to use while she adjusted to Kubuntu. She wouldn't have done any of that on her own. It's a heartfelt anecdote, but it's hardly the typical consumer scenario.


The point of the tale (admittedly an atypical one) that you seem to miss is that she didn't know how to set up a Windows installation for herself either, but she was able to buy a Windows installation from the computer shop.

Her purchased Windows installation kept breaking on her through her normal use of it ... to the point where it no longer worked at all and would have required as much expense (each time it broke) to get fixed (if she didn't have my help) as the original cost.

She didn't know how to set up a Linux installation for herself (if she didn't have my help) but she couldn't buy it from a computer shop ... because it wasn't offered to her as an option.

When she did get a Linux installation on her machine ... it didn't break on her through her normal use of the machine, and she found out quite quickly that in her normal use she didn't need Windows at all ... (once she was able to get a working Linux installation supplied to her).

Edited 2008-07-08 07:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Comment by satan666
by CGI_Joe on Tue 8th Jul 2008 17:28 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by satan666"
CGI_Joe Member since:
2008-02-20

She would not have bought a machine from a store with Kubuntu on it. Even if they had two boxes right next to each other. My point is that simply making something available doesn't mean anyone will buy it. A couple years ago Wal-Mart, one of the largest retail chains in North America, tried selling computers with a Linux-based OS for about $200. They were extremely popular with Linux aficionados, but other than that no one else bought them and they were pulled from shelves.

What will really move Linux-based machines in to consumers' homes is use in the office. Linux distributions should concentrate harder on workstations. Microsoft Office and Windows 95 were really how Microsoft won people over. That and video games. Linux is mostly used at home by people who use it at work. Work is the best way to force someone to do something, and the easiest way to make sure they keep doing it when they get home.

Reply Parent Score: 1