Linked by Amjith Ramanujam on Fri 25th Jul 2008 16:08 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Linux Daniel Phillips has announced the prototype design of a new linux filesystem (implementation has only begun). The most interesting thing seems to be a different way of implementing versioning: "Unlike the currently fashionable recursive copy on write designs with one tree root per version, Tux3 stores all its versioning information in the leaves of btrees using the versioned pointer algorithm. This method promises a significant shrinkage of metadata for heavily versioned filesystems as compared to ZFS and Btrfs".
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fernandotcl
Member since:
2007-08-12

"This is entirely a function of the GPL licensing of Linux, and has nothing to do with the licensing of ZFS
I don't know what you've been drinking but it must be strong! If ZFS was licensed with BSD 2 clause for example instead of CDDL, then there wouldn't have been any issue with reusing ZFS code inside the Linux kernel. CDDL is GPL incompatible because Sun wanted to avoid the risk of having their code reused inside the Linux kernel. The CDDL was written at a time when ~70% of opensource projects are under the GPL, yet it's GPL-incompatible and that's the fault of the GPL? Bullshit! You may dislike the GPL, but at least it was written to defend the liberty of the users, the CDDL was written to protect Sun from Free Software competition (Linux), barf! "
I think the point is, the CDDL is not incompatible with the GPL, it's the GPL that is incompatible with the CDDL.

And an observation: the CDDL was written to protect Sun from Linux competition (allegedly), but the act of open sourcing their operating system should be considered a great thing by itself.

It seems to me that some people believe that Sun is inherently evil because they didn't choose the GPL. I guess it's a lose-lose situation. If you open up your sources, the community will criticize your license. If you keep your sources closed, the community will criticize your lack of acts that "defend the liberty of the users". Making money is evil, apparently.

Some people will keep whining and whining until they manage to make you go their way or give up and ignore them.

EDIT: Oh, and people seem to think that you can simply copy and paste Solaris code in Linux. Yea, it works just like that. Linux doesn't support RBAC? No problemo, just copy rbac.c over and run make.

Edited 2008-07-25 21:22 UTC

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ninuxpdb Member since:
2008-07-27

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