Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 25th Jul 2008 22:55 UTC, submitted by Chavez
Windows While Microsoft has only just begun fighting the perception problems surrounding Windows Vista, the company is already thinking and planning way beyond its latest operating system. We all know that Windows 7 will build on top of the foundations laid by Vista, and that it will include a fancy multitouch framework (and a mysterious new taskbar). According to Microsoft, Windows 7 is still on track for January 2010, and in a memo to his employees, CEO Steve Ballmer outlined some interesting new approaches the company might try with Windows 7 - including being just a little more like Apple.
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RE[3]: what hardware design
by kaiwai on Mon 28th Jul 2008 03:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: what hardware design"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Gotta disagree with you kaiwai. Apple's engineering involves choosing which components to use and the case, and thats about it. They tend to choose the high end of mid range pretty much across the board, but there is nothing special about apple hardware, and as machines go you can do much, much better.

IMO even their cases are very overrated. Typically they have a nice, clean esthetic, but have very poor cooling. The macbook air can't even play a 45 min xvid without the machine overheating to the point where one of the cores shuts down, leaving you without enough performance to finish watching the rest. The macbook pro is better then that, but I wouldn't want to push the hardware too much for any substantial length of time. Honestly, what it comes down to is they didn't want to put more vents on the bottom because they wanted to keep things pretty.

Keep in mind, this is coming from a lifelong apple fan. That machine in my avatar delivered is one of my favorite machines I have ever owned.


You're right about the MacBook Air; then again, I always thought it was a stupid idea. When you read many of the talk backs on forums, the majority didn't want a MacBook Air, what they wanted was the return of the 12inch PowerBook - basically a 12inch MacBook Pro, and the unwashed masses would have been content (with an Atom, it would be a very nice seller).

As for the MacBook Pro - I never liked the case of them. I found the aluminium look was too bling oriented. I preferred a simple white laptop without all the razzel dazzel which the MacBook Pro seems to have.

As for my MacBook, I use it on a flat surface, and the most I get is 47 degrees Celsius for my Airport card, the rest sit at around 34-37degrees Celsius - well within the 'safe temperature' range.

Edited 2008-07-28 03:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: what hardware design
by netpython on Mon 28th Jul 2008 13:30 in reply to "RE[3]: what hardware design"
netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

I bought a simple 2x2GHz core2duo HP laptop with 3 GB RAM for half the prize of a MacBook.

Although Linux isn't allways suitable when you have to install the OS yourself, *NIX is a killer when it comes to networking.

Why spending so much money on Apple when all you need is a linux laptop with kismet and or aircrack-ng (no pun intended)?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: what hardware design
by kaiwai on Mon 28th Jul 2008 18:38 in reply to "RE[4]: what hardware design"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I bought a simple 2x2GHz core2duo HP laptop with 3 GB RAM for half the prize of a MacBook.

Although Linux isn't allways suitable when you have to install the OS yourself, *NIX is a killer when it comes to networking.

Why spending so much money on Apple when all you need is a linux laptop with kismet and or aircrack-ng (no pun intended)?


Depends on what you need to use it for. For me, the only viable operating systems are Windows and MacOS X - so you can guess which one I chose. I have nothing against Linux, it just isn't suitable for what I wish to accomplish in my day to day computing activities ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2